Radiolab
Radiolab
Jan 31, 2018
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect - One Nation, Under Money
Play • 55 min

An unassuming string of 16 words tucked into the Constitution grants Congress extensive power to make laws that impact the entire nation. The Commerce Clause has allowed Congress to intervene in all kinds of situations — from penalizing one man for growing too much wheat on his farm, to enforcing the end of racial segregation nationwide. That is, if the federal government can make an economic case for it. This seemingly all-powerful tool has the potential to unite the 50 states into one nation and protect the civil liberties of all. But it also challenges us to consider: when we make everything about money, what does it cost us?

Post Reports
Post Reports
The Washington Post
Whose Senate is it anyway?
A standoff in the Senate. How essential workers are faring almost a year into the coronavirus pandemic. And, why vaccine rollout has been so slow in France. Read more: When President Biden took office last week, he promised sweeping, bipartisan legislation to solve the pandemic, fix the economy and overhaul immigration. Just days later, the Senate ground to a halt, its members unable to agree on rules for how the evenly divided body should operate. Reporter Mike DeBonis unpacks the standstill.  At the start of the pandemic, grocery workers were lauded by their companies and customers for their essential work. Some leveraged that support into hazard pay. Some successfully pushed for mask enforcement in their stores. Almost a year later, they’re still on the front lines every day – but appreciation for their sacrifice has waned. Photographer May-Ying Lam reports on the plight of these essential workers.  France has had a particularly slow vaccine rollout, especially compared with its European neighbors like Germany. Foreign affairs reporter Rick Noack explains the delays facing one of the world’s most vaccine-skeptical countries.  If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners – two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to around $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
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