How President Biden Will Tackle the Economic Crisis
Play • 1 hr 1 min

Joe Biden takes the helm as the 46th president of the United States during an unprecedented crisis. The coronavirus pandemic has killed more than 400,000 Americans, nearly 16 million remain unemployed, and the peaceful transfer of power was disrupted by a violent mob unleashed by the former president. Unity was the centerpiece of President Biden’s inaugural address, but he also acknowledged that unity cannot be achieved without addressing the division and anger that defined the last four years. Nick Fandos, congressional correspondent for The New York Times, Toluse Olorunnipa, national political reporter at The Washington Post, and Clare Malone, a freelance writer, reflect on the last four years and discuss President Biden’s path forward.

The precarious nature of the economy is among the challenges President Biden has inherited. Record unemployment continues as major sectors of the economy remain shut down as a result of the pandemic. Having introduced a $1.9 trillion stimulus package ahead of inauguration, President Biden is hoping to bring Republicans on board to demonstrate his commitment to bipartisanship. But it’s unlikely that Republicans will support his plan as it currently reads even though distributing aid to suffering businesses and families is a time-sensitive matter. Heather Long from The Washington Post and Derek Thompson from The Atlantic describe the economy as it stands today and what approach President Biden should take in implementing another stimulus package.

Plus, Kamala Harris made history this week as she became the first woman and woman of color to be sworn in as vice president. Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY’s List and author of "Run to Win: Lessons in Leadership for Women Changing the World," has spent her professional life working to elect pro-choice Democratic women to public office. She spoke with Amy Walter about how drastically things have changed for women in politics throughout her career and the magnitude of Vice President Harris’ ascent to the White House.     

Words Matter
Words Matter
Katie Barlow
Shirley Chisholm - Black Feminist Pioneer
As Black History Month ends and Women’s History Month begins, we wanted to honor a pioneer in the struggle for equal rights for both movements. Shirley Anita Chisholm was a politician, educator, activist, community organizer and author. Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1924, as a child during the Great Depression - while her parents struggled to make ends meet - young Shirley and her two sisters were sent to Barbados to live with their Grandmother. Long before the Civil Rights movement in the United States, young Shirley watched as her community advocated for their rights as she witnessed the Barbados workers' and anti-colonial independence movements. Chisholm would later say about her time on Barbados with her Grandmother: “Granny gave me strength, dignity, and love. I learned from an early age that I was somebody. I didn't need the Black Revolution to tell me that." In 1964, after nearly two decades as an educator and community activist, Chisholm ran for and was elected to the New York State Assembly. Even within the New York Democratic Party, Shirley Chisholm had faced resistance to candidacy based on her sex - so she took her campaign directly to women, using her role as Brooklyn branch president of Key Women of America to mobilize female voters. Four years later - in 1968, Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman elected to the United States Congress, representing New York's 12th congressional district for seven terms from 1969 to 1983.  Her 1968 congressional campaign slogan was "Unbought and Unbossed" - which later became the title of her memoir and a documentary film on her amazing life.  On January 25, 1972, in a Baptist church in her district in Brooklyn - Shirley Chisholm became the first African-American candidate for a major party's nomination for President of the United States, and the first woman to run for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. In her presidential announcement - she called for a "bloodless revolution" at the forthcoming Democratic nominating convention and described herself as representative of the people offering a new articulation of American identity:  "I am not the candidate of Black America, although I am Black and proud. I am not the candidate of the women's movement of this country, although I am a woman and equally proud of that. I am the candidate of the people and my presence before you, symbolizes a new era in American political history." Let’s listen to Civil Rights and Women’s Rights Pioneer Shirley Chisholm announce her candidacy for President of the United States.  Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/words-matter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14 min
The Lead with Jake Tapper
The Lead with Jake Tapper
CNN
Third life-saving vaccine on its way to Americans as CDC director gives stark warning about cases & deaths; Trump hints at 2024 presidential run after his 2020 loss; Second Gov. Cuomo accuser: he “has refused to acknowledge or take responsibility” for…
U.S. begins distribution of Johnson & Johnson vaccine; First trucks carrying J&J vaccine arriving at UPS shipping facility this afternoon; CA lawmakers agree on plan to get kids back into classrooms; CDC director “deeply concerned” promising trajectory of pandemic could shift; CDC director: “we are not out of the woods yet”; WH: distribution of J&J vaccine “should be even” across communities; Donald Trump’s niece on the ex-president & his influence; Mary Trump says she thinks Donald Trump will at least “pretend” to run for president again; Trump vows revenge on republicans who voted to impeach; Mary Trump: GOP refused to take “off ramp” on Trump; Mary Trump: Donald Trump is the republican party; Trump tax returns in hands of Manhattan district attorney; NY attorney general to appoint independent investigator into sexual harassment claims against Gov. Cuomo; NY Attorney general: finings from Gov Cuomo probe will be released in public report; Gov. Cuomo hires high-powered attorney for nursing home scandal; NY mayor: the governor issued a “total non-apology”; NY mayor: the governor treated sexual harassment as some kind of laughing matter; NY Mayor: “I cringed” when I heard the allegations; Second Gov,. Cuomo accuser “understood” he wanted to sleep with her and “felt horribly uncomfortable and scared”; NYC mayor: I don’t see how anyone can function as a governor; DHS secy calls situation at border a “challenge”, not “crisis”; Biden admin: immigrants from central America “need to wait” before trying to come to U.S.; DHS secy: families separated at border could b reunited in U.S.; WH: to personally help negotiate $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill with senate; Biden admin defends decision to not punish Saudi crown prince for Khashoggi murder despite U.S. intel report; Trump faces five separate investigations in NY, GA & DC; Right now: Trump’s taxes in the hands of New York prosecutor; Prosecutors in Georgia open criminal probe into Trump’s attempt to influence election; Georgia GOP secretary of State investigates Trump’s attempts to overturn election; DC prosecutor launches investigation into Trump’s role in January 6 capitol attack; Former French president sentenced in corruption case; Rising opera star loses battle with COVID-19 at age 38; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy
38 min
The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
Chuck Rosenberg, NBC News
Robert S. Mueller III: The Director (Part 2)
Robert S. Mueller III – Bob Mueller – is an American hero. Though best known as the sixth Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and as the Special Counsel that led the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, the story of Bob’s public service starts half a century earlier. As recounted in the first episode, Bob was born in Manhattan and raised in Princeton, New Jersey. The oldest of five children, and the only boy, he was a star three sport athlete in high school and excelled in the classroom and on the lacrosse fields of Princeton, where he went to college. Following the death of a Princeton teammate in Vietnam, Bob volunteered for service there. In 1968, after officer training, including graduation from the rigorous Army Ranger School, the Marines deployed Bob to Vietnam. There, as a young second lieutenant, he led a rifle platoon along the Demilitarized Zone. Bob did not fear death in Vietnam – though death was all around him. He feared failure, which meant he had to do all he could to ensure that the young Marines under his command survived the war and made it home. A recipient of the Bronze Star (with valor) and the Purple Heart, Bob returned to the United States after his service in Vietnam and graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law. He became a federal prosecutor in San Francisco, and embarked on a career that would take him to the heights of federal law enforcement in this country, and to the helm of the FBI. This episode – the second part – begins as Bob becomes the Director of the FBI, just a few days before the devastating attacks of 9/11. A meeting with President Bush in the White House on the morning of September 12 dramatically changed Bob’s assessment of what the FBI needed to do to prevent another attack and led to an extensive restructuring of the FBI – one that was not immediately embraced in all corners of the organization. Bob navigated difficult challenges as he led a post 9/11 FBI, including an effort – that he opposed – to split the FBI into two agencies along the lines of Britain’s MI-5 and MI-6. He also forbid FBI special agents from conducting interrogations of terrorist subjects that did not adhere to well established constitutional rules and procedures – a decision that was not particularly popular within certain quarters of the FBI at the time, but that turned out to be wise and prescient. It is fascinating to see the FBI through the eyes of the man who served for 12 years as its Director – the second longest tenure in history – and the only person ever to be nominated as FBI Director by two presidents – George W. Bush and Barack Obama. I should again add a word about what is not in either episode – any detailed discussion of Bob’s work as Special Counsel leading the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Bob was clear when he testified before Congress about this work and his report, and that the report spoke for itself. He did not opine about his findings and does not do so here, either. One of the things I learned while working for Bob Mueller at the FBI is that you take this decent, honorable, and courageous man at his word. Because he is a man of few words, each word matters a lot and so it is worth listening carefully. Bob shares with host Chuck Rosenberg in this second part (of a two-part interview) the story of his tenure at the FBI, leading it through a challenging and difficult post 9/11 period. *** _A postscript: _ _On February 2, 2021, the day before we published this episode, heartbreaking news out of Sunrise, Florida, underscored the sacrifices that men and women who take the oath often make in service to our nation: two FBI special agents, Daniel Alfin, 36, and Laura Schwartzenberger, 43, were killed in the line of duty while serving a court-authorized search warrant in a child predator investigation. Three additional FBI special agents were injured. Bob Mueller spoke in this final Season Four episode of the anguish he felt when FBI special agents – indeed any law enforcement officer – were killed in the line of duty. Though not widely known within the FBI, Bob kept pictures of these fallen heroes in his office during his tenure. Special Agents Alfin and Schwartzenberger avowed the same oath so many of our other guests avowed – to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic. On the morning of February 2, 2021, after years of selfless, noble, and honorable service to the FBI and to the nation, they made the ultimate sacrifice. May they rest in peace._ *** If you have thoughtful feedback on this episode or others, please email us at theoathpodcast@gmail.com. Find the transcript and all our previous episodes at MSNBC.com/TheOath
55 min
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