Flora Yukhnovich
40 min
In Episode 26 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the highly-acclaimed, sensation of a painter, FLORA YUKHNOVICH! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] And WOW was it an honour to interview Flora at her studio (the week before lockdown!) and discuss in-depth her INCREDIBLE works that adopt the language of the Rococo, reimagining the DYNAMISM of works by 18th century artists such as Tiepolo to Fragonard! Fusing high and low cultures through a filter of contemporary Cultural references, including film, food, and music videos – think Katy Perry to Niki Minaj! – Flora brings in painterly traditions in a more consciously feminine realm by featuring wisps of millennial pinks and purples. Variation is a driving force with mark making ranging from delicate flourishes through dramatic and gestural brushstrokes heightening the rhythmic sensuality that play that conjure up in her MASTERPIECES. Since graduating from City and Guilds in 2017, Flora has gone on to exhibited widely – including at the likes of Leeds Art Gallery, Parafin, Jerwood Gallery, as well as completing the Great Women Artists residency at Palazzo Monti (!) and has a current (now online!) exhibition at VICTORIA MIRO! Check it out:  https://www.victoria-miro.com/exhibitions/558/ In this episode we uncover Flora's meticulous process, her references, beginnings as an artist, and her love for the Rococo – as well as such an insight into its history. Wow.  We also discuss her experience living in Venice, where she visited the Tiepolos on a daily basis, and reimagined them in her masterpieces!!!  Flora is a GENIUS, and one of the most highly regarded young painters in the WORLD right now, so please do enjoy this episode!  This episode is sponsored by Alighieri  https://alighieri.co.uk/ @alighieri_jewellery Use the code: TGWA for 10% off!  Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Amber Miller (@amber_m.iller) Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/
The Art Angle
The Art Angle
Artnet News
Re-air: The Rise and Fall of Anne Geddes, Queen of Baby Photography
The Art Angle team is taking this week off for Thanksgiving, but we thought we'd share one of our favorite episodes from the past year to see you through this unconventional holiday weekend. Picture this: a doughy, apple-cheeked infant nestled in between the soft petals of a dew-kissed flower, sound asleep, like the start of a real-life fable. Almost everyone who conjures that mental image will do so using a nearly identical aesthetic—and whether you realize it or not, that’s almost entirely because of the work of legendary baby photographer Anne Geddes. After her debut photography book, Down in the Garden, soared to number three on the New York Times Bestseller list in 1996, Geddes’s wholesomely surreal infant images became inescapable. Oprah went on air to declare Down in the Garden the best coffee-table book she’d ever seen, and by late December 1997, Geddes’s publishing partners had sold more than 1.8 billion (yes, with a “b”) calendars and date books of her photography for the upcoming year. Her dizzying success soon spurred the artist to ramp up production, with a standard Geddes shoot requiring six-to-eight months of planning and a budget between $250,000 and $350,000. But who could blame her for going big? Geddes’s empire of adorable infants seemed unstoppable. Cut to 2020, however, and the picture has changed dramatically—not just for Geddes, but for an entire creative economy driven by analog photography, print publishing, and the high barriers to entry formerly associated with both. Years after smartphones first began putting increasingly high-quality cameras in nearly everyone’s pocket, and Instagram began providing masses of self-trained shutterbugs a free and wide-reaching distribution platform for their images, it’s not hyperbole to say that the pillars on which Geddes built her career have crumbled. So what’s the Queen of Baby Photography to do when her kingdom becomes unrecognizable? Back in May, Andrew Goldstein chatted with Noor Brara, Artnet’s art and design editor, about her recent profile of Geddes. Together, they discussed the artist’s rise, fall, and reckoning with culture’s digital evolution.
26 min
Talk Art
Talk Art
Russell Tovey and Robert Diament
Lauren Weedman
For the final episode of Season 7, Russell & Robert meet Lauren Weedman, best known for her standout role as Doris on HBO's television series Looking (alongside Russell!). As well as being a leading actress and comedian (not comedienne - as we discuss!!!!!!), one of her longterm passions is painting and making art. On her instagram @ThisOneIsTitled, started during lockdown, Weedman revealed 'The Quarantine Series' of unique figurative paintings, which she sells from $200 via Instagram and have become incredibly popular with collectors all over the world! As a self taught artist, including series where she makes one new work a day, we consider her link to Outsider and Outlier artworks but also explore her wide ranging artistic influences including Laura Owens, Tim Burton, David Lynch but primarily Edvard Munch and Van Gogh, whose authentic and emotional-charged works became even more important during her time spent living in Amsterdam. We also discover her love of London's very own National Portrait Gallery, in particular an installation she saw there of William Blake's death mask! Plus we introduce Lauren to the work of Grayson Perry and his recent 'Art Club' TV series which focused on ideas of creativity and the processes behind making art. Check out Lauren's paintings at her official website: www.LaurenWeedmanStudio.com which includes very cool videos of her discussing individual artworks! Follow Lauren's two Instagram accounts: @Lauren_Weedman and her art page @ThisOneIsTitled. You can watch Lauren & Russell in HBO's 'Looking' on Netflix, Amazon Prime or all good streaming services. Thanks for listening to Season 7! We will return on 4th December 2020 with a brand new Season 8, so fear not, we have another art-thrill-ride lined up for you!!! For images of all artworks discussed in this episode visit @TalkArt. Talk Art theme music by Jack Northover @JackNorthoverMusic courtesy of HowlTown.com We've just joined Twitter too @TalkArt. If you've enjoyed this episode PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe 5 stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. Thank you for listening to Talk Art, we will be back very soon. For all requests, please email talkart@independenttalent.com   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 12 min
Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood
Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood
Conversations about the business of art, inside the artist studio, and plei
From Sketching Handbags to Creating Reclaimed Earth Colors and More: An Interview with Artist, John Sabraw
Have you ever felt like you just don’t “fit in” at non-artist gatherings? What do you do with that feeling? Do you shrink back and retreat to the safety of your peers and insulate? Or do you press into the discomfort and forge your path? Everyone’s story is going to be different and that’s the beauty of our corner of society, we embrace the mosaic of diversity - but what would it look like if we were to integrate our creative outlook with other areas? That’s where my guest and talented artist, John Sabraw comes in! Hailing from Lakenheath, England, John is an activist and environmentalist - his paintings, drawings, and collaborative installations are produced in an eco-conscious manner, and he continually works toward a fully sustainable practice. In our conversation, John opens up about his time working with Kerry James Marshall and how he got involved with Gamblin and producing their reclaimed earth colors. Trust me, you’ll find John’s perspective refreshing and engaging - I know I did! Throwing it all away You know those days where you feel like tossing everything in your studio in the garbage? Imagine doing that and then getting an invitation to Washington DC to meet members of Congress because your art was selected as the winner of a competition. Sounds crazy, right? It actually happened to John Sabraw! As he struggled in high school and tried to decipher the way he wanted his life to go, John reached a breaking point where he just had to walk away. He took all his artwork that he had completed in his high school art class and tossed it in the dumpster and then took off for a week. When he returned, what he saw changed the course of his career - his teacher had entered him into a contest and he had won! John’s journey wasn’t all smooth sailing from there - he faced setbacks and challenges but this initial success helped see the talent he had honed. Speaking your truth How does your truth, your authenticity show up in your artwork? Do you try to embrace it or do you try to go in a different direction? As the United States was gearing up for the Iraq war in 2003, John felt like he needed to speak out and share his conviction that war was not the answer with his art. The result was a fierce backlash that made John rethink his approach and if he wanted to make a stand that would continue to incur this type of reaction from people. John didn’t back down, he just decided to change his approach - this launched him on the path to his work with sustainability and activism. Exploring sustainability Imagine visiting a community ravished by the scourge of industrial waste and environmental destruction and finding in that mess and contamination a way to create sustainable paint colors. No, this isn’t a pipe dream, this actually happed with John’s efforts to collaborate with scientists on many projects. One of his current collaborations involves creating paint and paintings from iron oxide extracted in the process of remediating polluted streams. I hope you are as inspired by John’s story as I have been - make sure to check out images of John’s artwork located at the end of this post! Outline of This Episode * [2:50] I introduce my guest, John Sabraw. * [4:00] How did John get started as an artist? * [18:30] John describes his artwork. * [25:00] Speaking authentically and truthfully. * [27:30] Exploring sustainability. * [33:00] How artists can help with creative problem-solving. * [45:00] Why we need more artists who speak up and break out of their silos. * [52:00] You don’t have to be an expert to contribute to the conversation. * [55:00] Closing thoughts. Other artists mentioned on this episode * Savvy Painter Anti-Racist Episode * Jacob Lawrence * Kerry James Marshall Resources Mentioned on this episode * www.johnsabraw.com * TED talk: www.ted.com/talks/john_sabraw_how_i_make_paint_from_poison * Gamblin Reclaimed Colors: https://gamblincolors.com/reclaimed-earth-colors/
1 hr 2 min
The Making of...
The Making of...
The Female Lead
8: The Making of Mel Giedroyc - The Great British Bake Off, Female Friendship and The Loneliness of Being a New Mum
Welcome to the final episode of this series of The Making Of... from The Female Lead.  Our guest this week is the comedian, actor, writer and national treasure Mel Giedroyc! This was our first ever conversation with Mel, but it feels like talking to an old friend because she is so relaxed and funny and loves a chat. She is also packed full of wisdom - just as a national treasure should be. Best known as part of the Mel and Sue double act, she started out doing live sketch comedy, then moved into acting and presenting, culminating in seven years hosting the phenomenal Great British Bake Off. Famous for their unique style of gentle but irreverent humour, Mel and Sue set the tone for what has become one of Britain's best-loved shows.  As well as presenting, acting and everything else, Mel has also written two books on motherhood and now her first novel The Best Things (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Best-Things-Mel-Giedroyc/dp/1472256212) , which is out in the new year.  Mel shared a great list of moments that have made her, ranging from her first “road to Damascus moment” in the theatre and up to losing her house in her 40s. We also talked about the loneliness of being a new mum, female friendship and how she managed seven years of eating loads of cake. The interview was recorded over zoom, at the height of lockdown, so please bear with us as some bits may sound a little wobbly.  Although this is the last episode, we will be back soon with a new series of brilliant women in the new year.  * Mel Giedroyc grew up in Leatherhead as the youngest of four children,  she went to Cambridge University where she met Sue Perkins and they formed a double act which was shortlisted for the Best Newcomers Award at the Edinburgh Festival. They built a long-standing professional relationship including hosting Light Lunch and then Late Lunch on Channel Four. Mel & Sue are best known these days for presenting The Great British Bake Off. In September 2016, Love Productions switched the contract to televise The Great British Bake Off from the BBC to Channel Four. Both Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc stepped down as hosts of the show after seven years. In her career, Mel has worked on numerous TV shows and radio shows, as well as on stage - most recently in Steven Sondheim’s Company in the West End and Much Ado About Nothing at the Rose Theatre.  Mel has always loved writing and has published two books about motherhood  From Here to Maternity: One Mother of a Journey and Going Ga-Ga (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Here-Maternity-One-Mother-Journey/dp/0091897505) : Is there life after birth? In 2021 her first novel The Best Things (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Best-Things-Mel-Giedroyc/dp/1472256212) will be released. * The Making Of is hosted by Bea Appleby and is edited by Lauren Lind. The production is brought to you by The Female Lead (http://www.thefemalelead.com) And the whole series is very kindly sponsored by Missoma (https://uk.missoma.com/)
55 min
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