8. When They See Her: The Story of Michelle Cusseaux
38 min
December 14th, 2019 marks the fifth anniversary of the Say Her Name campaign, a movement founded to raise awareness of the names and stories of Black women, girls and femmes killed by police, and to provide support to the families affected. The campaign has produced a groundbreaking report expanding the conversation on police violence so that it foregrounds the experiences of Black women and girls, earned a nod in a tweet from a major presidential candidate, developed a multimedia arts-activism venture called Say Her Name: The Lives That Should Have Been, and convened the #SayHerName Mothers Network, a community for mothers of Black women lost to police violence. But none of these developments would be possible without the courage, resilience and ingenuity of Fran Garrett, the mother of Michelle Cusseaux. Cusseaux, a 50-year-old Black woman, was shot and killed on August 14, 2014 by Officer Percy Dupra while Phoenix police were trying to serve a mental health wellness check. Her life was taken just days after the police killing of Ferguson, MO teenager Mike Brown became national news, sparking nationwide outrage and galvanizing the modern movement for Black lives. To help Cusseaux’s story gain resonance in its own right, Garrett led a group of local activists in marching her daughter’s casket through downtown Phoenix, calling for an outside agency to investigate the shooting and a slew of reforms aimed at racial justice and mental health parity. It was this brave act that drew the attention of the African American Policy Forum, which catalyzed the Say Her Name campaign and the delineation of a throughline linking the loss of Cusseaux with countless other Black women like her lost too soon to state violence. Garrett’s bid for broader attention to the cause was amplified a few months later at the Millions March NYC, where AAPF made an intersectional intervention by saying the names of Michelle and other slain Black women to politicize their legacies alongside the demands made on behalf of Brown and other victims of police violence. On this special episode of Intersectionality Matters, Kimberlé Crenshaw dives deep with Fran Garrett to go beyond the headlines for the unvarnished truth on the unspeakably tragic loss of a beloved Phoenix community member. Tune in as they take stock of the movement’s progress five years in and assess the headway still to be made in making Black women’s vulnerability to police violence fully legible as a social problem. Music by Blue Dot Sessions Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine Recorded by Sarah Ventre and Julia Sharpe-Levine Additional support provided by Andrew Sun, G’Ra Asim, Emmett O’Malley and Michael Kramer Twitter: @IMKC_podcast, IG: @IntersectionalityMatters, Fb: Intersectionality Matters with Kimberlé Crenshaw #IntersectionalityMatters LEARN MORE: http://aapf.org/shn-campaign SAY HER NAME CEREMONY OF REMEMBRANCE (NYC)- https://www.eventbrite.com/e/say-her-name-5th-anniversary-remembrance-ceremony-tickets-85292830151 MICHELLE CUSSEAUX MENTAL HEALTH FAIR (PHX)-https://www.aahherc.com/
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check
5: It’s Time America Abolished Poverty
There are a lot of jobs we as a country don’t value. Think farm work, child care, service jobs—these low-wage, often racialized and gendered jobs form the backbone of our economy, but if you’ve worked in any of these fields, you know how hard it can be to make ends meet on these jobs. Three of Dorian Warren’s grandparents were janitors, another job that doesn’t get its due. But they were also proud members of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and through their work and their union they learned a vital lesson. If we want to improve working conditions for these undervalued jobs, you can either upgrade the workers, or you can upgrade the jobs—or you can do both. Upgrading and transforming jobs, especially dangerous and poverty-level jobs in growing sectors like care work (https://www.thenation.com/article/society/coronavirus-child-care-nurses-essential/) , is a critically important strategy precisely because of the historically devalued nature of this labor. But it takes power—the collective power of workers joining together with communities—to redesign the system of bad, poverty-level jobs into good jobs. On this week’s show, Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren follow up on last week’s episode (https://www.thenation.com/podcast/society/poverty-inequality-basic-income/) to answer the question: How can we eradicate poverty in America? It's not just about jobs, and the answers are common sense, but radical: To end poverty, we need to meet people’s real needs, like food, or diapers, or childcare, but we also need to disrupt and reform the systems that keep people in poverty, and we need to give people the power to smash through the structures holding them back. For insight on how to get to a poverty-free America, Melissa and Dorian turn to experts leading campaigns and organizations fighting against the system of poverty. Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis (https://www.thenation.com/article/society/we-still-live-in-two-americas-not-one/) , co-director of the Kairos Center and national co-director of the Poor People’s Campaign, joins to discuss how abolishing poverty is a moral imperative—and it makes good policy sense as well, leading to stronger organizing possibilities for all working Americans. Next up, Mary Kay Henry (https://www.seiu.org/mary-kay-henry) , President of SEIU, joins to talk about the role of multi-racial worker power in disrupting the system of poverty. Henry talks to Melissa and Dorian in-depth about the innovative “Fight for $15 and a Union” campaign SEIU helped launched in 2012, and the transformative power of workers setting the terms of their own fights. We then check-in with—and give the final word to—two guests on the ground in North Carolina doing the work to fulfill the immediate needs of those living in poverty and struggling to make ends meet. We talk to Eric Aft, CEO of the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina (https://www.secondharvestnwnc.org/about-us) , who talks to us about “feeding the line and shortening the line” for the over 200,000 individuals his organization and its partners serve yearly. And Melissa and Dorian talk with Michelle Old, Executive Director of the North Carolina Diaper Bank, (https://ncdiaperbank.org/about-us) about how having access to diapers and what she calls “dignity items” is a vital necessity for babies, children and families to thrive. System Checklist  During the Covid-19 pandemic millions of Americans have fallen more deeply into poverty. Alleviating poverty in America requires political will, investment, and a strategy to win. During the past two weeks our System Check guests have identified two key issues that keep people poor: lack of cash and lack of power. This week’s System Checklist highlights a political agenda that addresses both. Raise the minimum wage. The last time Congress raised the federal minimum wage was 2007! We know that this meager $7.25 / hour minimum hasn't kept pace with cost of living. (https://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/01/21/if-worker-pay-had-kept-pace-productivity-gains-1968-todays-minimum-wage-would-be-24) Right now there is nowhere in the country where a full time, minimum wage worker can afford rent on a two bedroom apartment. We must raise the minimum wage. Join the Fight for 15. (https://fightfor15.org) Universal Health Care. Unexpected medical bills cause 40% of individual bankruptcies. (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/11/this-is-the-real-reason-most-americans-file-for-bankruptcy.html) Universal health care acknowledges that healthcare is a basic, human right and unlinks health and wealth. With access to affordable, available health care, families can spend their income on housing, food, and other necessities, while avoiding the medical bill caused spiral into poverty. Join the majority of Americans (https://www.kff.org/slideshow/public-opinion-on-single-payer-national-health-plans-and-expanding-access-to-medicare-coverage/) --support universal health care. Universal Childcare. One year of child care costs more than one year of tuition at most states’ four-year public colleges. (https://www.epi.org/child-care-costs-in-the-united-states/) Families need safe, accessible, affordable child care. We can alleviate poverty and change the trajectory of life for millions of American children with a substantial investment in childcare and early childhood education. Read this report from The Economic Policy Institute calling for “An Ambitious National Investment in America’s Children” (https://www.epi.org/publication/its-time-for-an-ambitious-national-investment-in-americas-children/) and sign up to join Childcare Changemakers (https://www.childcarechangemakers.org/) to enlist in the campaign for universal and equitable childcare for all families. Guaranteed Basic Income. Last week we heard from Aisha Nyandoro as she described the ways guaranteed basic income from The Magnolia’s Mother’s Trust (http://springboardto.org/index.php/blog/story/introducing-the-magnolia-mothers-trust) has affected the lives of Black mothers living in poverty in Mississippi. A Stockton, California, guaranteed income program (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-06-02/stockton-extends-its-universal-basic-income-pilot) has also ignited the interest around the country. If lack of cash is the core feature of poverty, then let’s get cash to the people. Learn about and support the work of the Economic Security Project.  (https://www.economicsecurityproject.org) Ensure Workers’ Right to Organize. Workers must have the right to organize in order to have a seat at the table of power. The power to negotiate wages and conditions of work is tied directly to the ability to organize and unionize. It’s time to update our outdated labor laws to adapt to our 21st century economy. Check out the campaigns of Jobs with Justice (https://www.jwj.org/) and Sign the Pledge (https://actionnetwork.org/forms/sign-the-jobs-with-justice-pledge?&source=NAT_W_homepage) to advance workers’ rights to organize. As always, we welcome your additions to our Checklist! Use our Twitter and Facebook pages to add your comments, suggested actions, and organizations to support. System Check is a project of The Nation magazine, hosted by Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren and produced by Sophia Steinert-Evoy. Support for System Check comes from Omidyar Network, a social change venture that is reimagining how capitalism should work. Learn more about their efforts to recenter our economy around individuals, community, and societal well-being at Omidyar.com (http://omidyar.com/) . Our executive producer is Frank Reynolds. Our theme music is by Brooklyn-based artist and producer Jachary (https://jachary.bandcamp.com/) . Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: http://thenation.com/podcastsubscribe.
40 min
QueerWOC
QueerWOC
QueerWOC
Ep 97: Sapphic Sock Seductress
Money and Nikeeta are back for the last QueerWOC episode of 2020. They celebrate Jamaican Trans advocate Renae Green as QueerWOC of the week. Money shares 5 ways to cope with this public health crisis holiday season! Nikeeta gives us part 1 of her election results breakdown. We think through what to call our partners and tackle the burning question of the season: socks or no socks when gettin it on? Where to find us: IG & Twitter - @queerwocpod FB - https://www.facebook.com/QueerWOCpod/ Tumblr - www.QueerWOC.com Listen to us on Soundcloud, Stitcher, Castbox, PocketCasts Contribute to QueerWOC via CashApp: $QueerWOCPod Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/queerwocpod Love us out loud by doing The R’s: Rate, Review, Request, Repost, Retweet, and Reply! Use the hashtag #QueerWOC to talk all things the podcast Send us an email or submit your Curved Chronicles: QueerWOCpod@gmail.com QueerWOC of the Week 00:10:55 Renae Green Associate Director of Policy & Advocacy for Trans Wave Jamaica, an organization committed to promoting Trans health and well-being through advocacy and visibility in Jamaica. @TransWaveJA She co-coordinated Jamaica’s first Trans Health and Wellness Conference in Kingston, JA in June 2019. Community Contributors 00:17:15 New patrons: Leah & Lucille Borders are fake shoutouts - Flint, TX / Cupertino, CA / Chatham, NY / Lyon, France Mental Moment with Money 00:23:45 Queer Quarantine Holidays: 5 ways to cope with limited social interactions during the holidays Challenge your narratives around holidays Connect with who you have Create a memorable moment for yourself Volunteer in your community Remember why you’re quarantining https://greatist.com/health/alone-for-the-holidays Word 00:49:40 What are white women REALLY voting about? Nikketa gives us the 1st part of her gender-race analysis of the 2020 presidential election. Topic 01:38:40 No topic this episode. Submit or suggest one by sending us an email @ queerwocpod@gmail.com Curved Chronicles 01:39:10 Socks or no socks? Is this even a question? Also, for what might be the first time ever, Money and Nikeeta both end the #QueerWOC year with a boo! Now if only we could figure out what to call them…
2 hr
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