The Dirt Podcast
The Dirt Podcast
Nov 30, 2020
Fish People - Ep 117
Play • 1 hr 8 min
I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
Garret and Sabrina
Two new ornithischians & a ceratopsid documentary
For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Pantydraco, links from Tara Cooper & Terry O'Neill, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Pantydraco-Episode-321/ To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino Dinosaur of the day Pantydraco, a sauropodomorph that isn't pronounced how you would expect, it's Welsh. Interview with Tara Cooper & Terry O'Neill. Tara is an artist and professor of fine arts at the University of Waterloo. Terry worked in the CBC documentary unit for 15 years, nowadays he makes independent docs. They collaborated on the brand new documentary Follow the Bones about Pachyrhinosaurus lakustai and the people behind the discovery. In dinosaur news this week: * A new ornithopod, Riabininohadros, was described from Crimea * Sinankylosaurus, the "Chinese Ankylosaurus" was formally described * A new theropod dinosaur from Mukawa, Hokkaido, Japan will likely be named soon * In Fujian, China paleontologists have found over 240 fossilized dinosaur footprints likely including sauropods, theropods, & ornithopods * According to Scientific American since 1824, 10,851 dinosaur fossils (about 1,000 species) have been documented * The National Museum of Niger is planning on expanding and refurbishing next year * The designs for the Mary Anning statue in Lyme Regis have been released * Myles Garrett celebrated his birthday with a Spinosaurus cake
1 hr 14 min
Nordic Mythology Podcast
Nordic Mythology Podcast
Mathias Nordvig and Daniel Farrand
Ep - 46 Capitol Controversy with Brute Norse
This week *Mathias** *and* **Daniel** *are sitting down with *Eirik Storesund**, *the content creator behind *Brute Norse**,  *a blog and podcast dedicated to dispelling the many popular misconceptions about the Viking Age and Norse culture, and bridging the gap between scholarship and public perception.  Together they will be discussing the riot in the US capitol last week, and the unfortunate public misconception of certain Norse symbols and cultual elements as a result. We've covered misappropriation of Viking symbols and the unfortunate ties with white supremacy before, and quite honestly we are sad to have to do so again so early in the year. However, given these unfortunate events though we don't really feel we have a choice. Lighter topics next week, we promise. Check out our new Instagram: *www.instagram.com/nordicmythologypodcast** *And if you would like what we do, and would to be in the audience for live streams of new episodes to ask questions please consider supporting us on *Patreon**: **www.patreon.com/NordicMythologyPodcast** *Currently we are trying to add 100 new Patrons! If that goal is met all Patrons will get to be part of a live streamed watch through of the show Vikings with *Mathias* and *Daniel* (and maybe some surprise guests). Members of the audience will get to ask questions and have them answered in real time! If you are a bit financially strapped right now but still want to help us out please consider leaving a review on Apple podcasts as that also really helps. Thank you for listening!
1 hr 19 min
Strange Animals Podcast
Strange Animals Podcast
Katherine Shaw
Episode 207: The Dire Wolf!
This week we're on the cutting edge of science, learning about the brand new genetic study of dire wolves that rearranges everything we know about the dire wolf and other canids! Also, a bonus turtle update. Further reading: Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves, Genetic Clues Reveal An artist's rendition of dire wolves and grey wolves fighting over a bison carcass (art by Mauricio Anton): The pig-nosed face of the Hoan Kiem turtle, AKA Yangtze giant softshell turtle, AKA Swinhoe's softshell turtle: Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I’m your host, Kate Shaw. You may have heard the news this past week about the new study about dire wolves. I thought it would make a great topic for an episode, and we’ll also have a quick update about a rare turtle that’s been in the news lately too. Dire wolves show up pretty often in movies and TV shows and video games and books, because as far as anyone knew until very recently, the dire wolf was an extra big wolf that lived in North America during the Pleistocene until it went extinct around 13,000 years ago. Researchers assumed it was a close cousin of the modern grey wolf. Well, in a brand new study published in Nature literally less than a week ago as this episode goes live, we now have results of a genetic study of dire wolf remains. The results give us surprising new information not just about the dire wolf, but about many other canids. The study started in 2016, when an archaeologist, Angela Perri, who specializes in the history of human and animal interactions, wanted to learn more about the dire wolf. She went around the United States to visit university collections and museums with dire wolf remains, and took the samples she collected to geneticist Kieren Mitchell. Perri, Mitchell, and their team managed to sequence DNA from five dire wolves that lived between 50,000 and 13,000 years ago. Then the team compared the dire wolf genome to those of other canids, including the grey wolf and coyote, two species of African wolf, two species of jackal, and the dhole, among others. To their surprise, the dire wolf’s closest relation wasn’t the grey wolf. It was the jackals, both from Africa, but even they weren’t very closely related. It turns out that 5.7 million years ago, the shared ancestor of dire wolves and many other canids lived in Eurasia. At this point sea levels were low enough that the Bering land bridge, also called Beringia, connected the very eastern part of Asia to the very western part of North America. One population of this canid migrated into North America while the rest of the population stayed in Asia. The two populations evolved separately until the North America population developed into what we now call dire wolves. Meanwhile, the Eurasian population developed into many of the modern species we know today, and eventually migrated into North America too. By the time the gray wolf populated North America, the dire wolf was so distantly related to it that even when their territories overlapped, they avoided each other and didn’t interbreed. We’ve talked about canids in many previous episodes, including how readily they interbreed with each other, so for the dire wolf to remain genetically isolated, it was obviously not closely related at all to other canids at this point. The dire wolf looked a lot like a grey wolf, but researchers now think that was due more to convergent evolution than to its relationship with wolves. Both lived in the same habitats: plains, grasslands, and forests. The dire wolf was slightly taller on average than the modern grey wolf, which can grow a little over three feet tall at the shoulder, or 97 cm, but it was much heavier and more solidly built. It wouldn’t have been able to run nearly as fast, but it could attack and kill larger animals. Its head was larger in proportion than the grey wolf’s and it had massive teeth that were adapted to crush bigger bones.
10 min
Medieval Archives
Medieval Archives
Medieval Archives
MAP 84: The Medieval Knight with Christopher Gravett
Click here to download the episode When people think of the Middle Ages one of the first images that pops into their head is a knight in shining armor. Knights are synonymous with the Middle Ages. Slaying dragons, saving damsels in distress, but beyond the fairy tales are the real life knights. Men who sacrificed and endlessly trained to earn the title of Knight. On this episode of the Medieval Archives podcast I'm joined by historian and author Christopher Gravett to discuss The Medieval Knight. Chris is a former curator at the Royal Armouries, Tower of London, and an expert in the field of medieval arms, armor and warfare. He also worked with numerous TV series and movies as a historical advisor including The Conquerors, Braveheart and Ivanhoe. Chris even advised Terry Jones, best known as part of Monty Python, for his books. Chris has some fascinating 'behind-the-scenes' stories. Chris's new book The Medieval Knight covers the evolution of the knight over 300 years, from the early Norman Knights of William the Conqueror to the gradual decline in the 15th century. We discuss a variety of topics including how knights trained, how armor evolved over the years and tournaments. Did you know a king and a prince were killed while jousting in a tournament! Listen in to find out. You can read my review of The Medieval Knight here. It is a fantastic book! Grab a copy today and enjoy the well researched history and the amazing pictures that help visualize the weapons and armor. You can buy The Medieval Knight through the links below: Amazon: https://amzn.to/2WwJ3Ri (affiliate link)Osprey Books website: https://ospreypublishing.com/the-medieval-knight
1 hr 14 min
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