49: How translators approach a text
34 min
Before even starting to translate a work, a translator needs to make several important macro-level decisions, such as whether to more closely follow the literal structure of the text or to adapt more freely, especially if the original text does things that are unfamiliar to readers in the destination language but would be familiar to readers in the original language.

In this episode of Lingthusiasm, your hosts Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne get enthusiastic about the relationship of the translator and the text. We talk about the new, updated translation of Beowulf by Maria Dahvana Headley (affectionately known as the "bro" translation), reading the Tale of Genji in multiple translations, translating conlangs in fiction, and mistranslation on the Scots Wikipedia.

Announcements

We’re coming up on Lingthusiasm’s fourth anniversary! In celebration, we’re asking you to help people who would totally enjoy listening to fun conversations about linguistics, they just don’t realize it exists yet! Most people still find podcasts through word of mouth, and we’ve seen a significant bump in listens each November when we ask you to help share the show, so we know this works. If you tag us @lingthusiasm on social media in your recommendation post, we will like/retweet/reshare/thank you as appropriate, or if you send a recommendation to a specific person, we won’t know about it but you can still feel a warm glow of satisfaction at helping out (and feel free to still tell us about it on social media if you’d like to be thanked!). Trying to think of what to say? One option is to pick a particular episode that you liked and share a link to that.

This month’s bonus episode was about honorifics, words like titles and forms of “you” that express when you’re trying to be extra polite to someone (and which can also be subverted to be rude or intimate). Get access to this and 43 other bonus episodes at https://www.patreon.com/lingthusiasm

This is also a good time to start thinking about linguistics merch and other potential gift ideas (paperback copies of Because Internet, anyone?), in time for them to arrive via the internet, if you’re ordering for the holiday season. Check out the Lingthusiasm merch store at https://lingthusiasm.com/merch

For links mentioned in this episode: https://lingthusiasm.com/post/632086691477323776/lingthusiasm-episode-49-how-translators-approach
Flash Forward
Flash Forward
Rose Eveleth
Home Sweet Home
Today we travel to a future where housing is guaranteed and provided to everybody.  Guests: Amanda Vail — Director of communications at Plymouth Housing Dr. Sam Tsemberis — Founder of Pathways Housing First and author of Housing First Manual: The Pathways Model to End Homelessness for People with Mental Illness and Addiction Dr. Ivis Garcia Zambrana — Assistant Professor of City & Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah Tara Raghuveer — Director of KC Tenants, director of the Homes Guarantee campaign at People’s Action Dr. Daniel Aldana Cohen — Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania & co-author of A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green Deal Carroll Fife — councilmember-elect for Oakland’s District 3, co-founder of Moms for Housing, director of Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment Oakland Voice Actors: Intro Phone Tree Voice — Brett Tubbs Amy — Ashley Kellem: Instagram, Website Maia — Shara Kirby → → → Further reading & resources here! ← ← ←  Flash Forward is hosted by, Rose Eveleth and produced by Julia Llinas Goodman. The intro music is by Asura and the outtro music is by Hussalonia. The episode art is by Matt Lubchansky. Get in touch:  Twitter // Facebook // Reddit // info@flashforwardpod.com Support the show: Patreon // Donorbox // Become a Time Traveler  Episode Sponsors:  Hello Fresh: Get fresh, pre-measured ingredients and mouthwatering seasonal recipes delivered right to your door. Go to HelloFresh.com/flashforward90 and use code flashforward90 to get $90 off including free shipping! Shaker & Spoon: A subscription cocktail service that helps you learn how to make hand-crafted cocktails right at home. Get $20 off your first box at shakerandspoon.com/ffwd. Tab for a Cause: A browser extension that lets you raise money for charity while doing your thing online. Whenever you open a new tab, you’ll see a beautiful photo and a small ad. Part of that ad money goes toward a charity of your choice! Join team Advice For And From The future by signing up at tabforacause.org/flashforward. Tavour: Tavour is THE app for fans of beer, craft brews, and trying new and exciting labels. You sign up in the app and can choose the beers you’re interested in (including two new ones DAILY) adding to your own personalized crate. Use code: flashforward for $10 off after your first order of $25 or more.  Purple Carrot: Purple Carrot is THE plant-based subscription meal kit that makes it easy to cook irresistible meals to fuel your body. Each week, choose from an expansive and delicious menu of dinners, lunches, breakfasts, and snacks! Get $30 off your first box by going to www.purplecarrot.com and entering code FLASH at checkout today! Purple Carrot, the easiest way to eat more plants!  The Listener: Get smart, surprising podcast recommendations in your inbox every day. Listeners to Flash Forward can get two extra months free at thelistener.co using the code flashforward20. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
25: A Writer’s Territory
The Scottish nature writer Jim Crumley takes the Slightly Foxed team on a tour of literary landscapes, from the lochs of the Trossachs and the mountainous Cairngorms to Aldo Leopold’s sand county in Wisconsin and Barry Lopez’s Arctic. Together they trace the chain of writers who have influenced Jim, from Robert Burns and Wordsworth to Thoreau and Walt Whitman, and see nature through the eyes of his hero, the great Scottish naturalist and photographer Seton Gordon. They discuss how folklore has demonized the wolf while Jim believes its reintroduction could hugely benefit the ecology of the Scottish landscape. And finally they venture off the beaten track with this month’s wide-ranging reading recommendations. Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 40 minutes; 24 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.  An Englishman’s Commonplace Book (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/an-englishmans-commonplace-book/) , Roger Hudson (1:14) A Boy at the Hogarth Press & A Parcel of Time (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hogarth-press-richard-kennedy-plain-foxed/) , Richard Kennedy (6:40)  Jim Crumley’s Seasonal Quartet: The Nature of Autumn (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-autumn/) , The Nature of Winter (https://saraband.net/sb-title/the-nature-of-winter/) , The Nature of Spring (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-spring/) , The Nature of Summer (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-summer/) (11:03) The Cairngorm Hills of Scotland, The Charm of Skye and Amid Snowy Wastes, Seton Gordon are out print, but some Seton Gordon titles are available from Trieste Publishing (https://triestepublishing.com/) (14:11) A High and Lonely Place (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-a-high-and-lonely-place/) , Jim Crumley (15:49) A Sand County Almanac (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/aldo-leopold-sand-county-almanac/) , Aldo Leopold (18:14) Arctic Dreams (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/barry-lopez-arctic-dreams/) , Barry Lopez (18:43) The Last Wolf (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/him-crumley-the-last-wolf/) , Jim Crumley (22:54) Highland River, Neil Gunn is currently out of stock at the publisher (31:07) Featherhood (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/charlie-gilmour-featherhood/) , Charlie Gilmour (33:28) The Silver Dark Sea (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/susan-fletcher-the-silver-dark-sea/) , Susan Fletcher (35:13) A Month in Siena (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hisham-matar-a-month-in-siena/) , Hisham Matar (36:12) The Hunting Party (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/lucy-foley-hunting-party/) , Lucy Foley (38:00) Related Slightly Foxed Articles Word from the Wood (https://foxedquarterly.com/aldo-leopold-sand-country-almanac-literary-review/) , Galen O’Hanlon on A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold, Issue 54 (18:14) Northern Lights (https://foxedquarterly.com/penelope-lively-barry-lopez-arctic-dreams-literary-review/) , Penelope Lively on Arctic Dreams, Barry Lopez, Issue 4 (18:43) Other Links An Englishmans’ Commonplace Book ‘launch party’ at John Sandoe Books (https://foxedquarterly.com/book-launch-roger-hudson-an-englishmans-commonplace-book-john-sandoe-books/) (1:19)  The Art Workers’ Guild (https://www.artworkersguild.org/) (1:54)  Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park (https://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/) (8:37)  Saraband, independent publisher (https://saraband.net/) (12:20)  Jim Crumley, The Scots Magazine (https://www.scotsmagazine.com/articles/category/explore/wildlife/) (31:56) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
40 min
The Art Angle
The Art Angle
Artnet News
Re-air: The Rise and Fall of Anne Geddes, Queen of Baby Photography
The Art Angle team is taking this week off for Thanksgiving, but we thought we'd share one of our favorite episodes from the past year to see you through this unconventional holiday weekend. Picture this: a doughy, apple-cheeked infant nestled in between the soft petals of a dew-kissed flower, sound asleep, like the start of a real-life fable. Almost everyone who conjures that mental image will do so using a nearly identical aesthetic—and whether you realize it or not, that’s almost entirely because of the work of legendary baby photographer Anne Geddes. After her debut photography book, Down in the Garden, soared to number three on the New York Times Bestseller list in 1996, Geddes’s wholesomely surreal infant images became inescapable. Oprah went on air to declare Down in the Garden the best coffee-table book she’d ever seen, and by late December 1997, Geddes’s publishing partners had sold more than 1.8 billion (yes, with a “b”) calendars and date books of her photography for the upcoming year. Her dizzying success soon spurred the artist to ramp up production, with a standard Geddes shoot requiring six-to-eight months of planning and a budget between $250,000 and $350,000. But who could blame her for going big? Geddes’s empire of adorable infants seemed unstoppable. Cut to 2020, however, and the picture has changed dramatically—not just for Geddes, but for an entire creative economy driven by analog photography, print publishing, and the high barriers to entry formerly associated with both. Years after smartphones first began putting increasingly high-quality cameras in nearly everyone’s pocket, and Instagram began providing masses of self-trained shutterbugs a free and wide-reaching distribution platform for their images, it’s not hyperbole to say that the pillars on which Geddes built her career have crumbled. So what’s the Queen of Baby Photography to do when her kingdom becomes unrecognizable? Back in May, Andrew Goldstein chatted with Noor Brara, Artnet’s art and design editor, about her recent profile of Geddes. Together, they discussed the artist’s rise, fall, and reckoning with culture’s digital evolution.
26 min
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
The Victorian Cult Of Shakespeare
For most of the 1700s, Shakespeare was considered a very good playwright. But in the 1800s, and especially during the Victorian period, Shakespeare became a prophet. Ministers began drawing their lessons from his texts. Scholars wrote books about the scriptural resonances of his words—often while taking those words out of context. Shakespeare’s works, the Victorians believed, offered religious revelations. In his new book, "The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare: Bardology in the Nineteenth Century," University of Washington Associate Professor of English Charles LaPorte examines this moment in literary and religious history. We invited him to join us on the podcast to tell us how people in the 19th century thought about Shakespeare, how the moment helped give rise to the “authorship controversy,” and how sometimes, even today, we read Shakespeare like the Victorians. LaPorte is interviewed by Barbara Bogaev. "The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare: Bardology in the Nineteenth Century" was published by Cambridge University Press in 2020. Dr. Charles LaPorte's previous book, "Victorian Poets and the Changing Bible," was named Best First Book in Victorian Studies by the Northeast Victorian Studies Association in 2011. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published November 24, 2020. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “I Am No Thing To Thank God On,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer, with help from Leonor Fernandez. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Paul Luke at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California.
37 min
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