Untangle
Untangle
Nov 26, 2020
Taylor White Moffitt — A Thanksgiving Day Gratitude Meditation
Play • 12 min
Today we’re wishing you a very happy Thanksgiving. We’re grateful for you, our listeners! We may or may not be physically with the people we love today, but this Positive Reflection meditation invites us to remember them and to feel grateful that they are in our lives. It also invites us to reflect on what’s good in our lives at this moment and to feel grateful for the big and little joys. We at Untangle, Muse, and Meditation Studio are wishing you a safe, loving, and happy thanksgiving wherever you are.
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
225: The Self-Centered Podcast Featuring Special Guest, Dr. Jill Levitt!
At the start of today’s podcast, we got an update on the Feeling Great app from Jeremy Karmel. We are looking for one or more programmers who might like to join our project. Our goal is to create the first electronic tool that can outperform human therapists, and some super promising preliminary data suggests we may be on the right path to make this happen. We are looking for talented engineers and designers who would share our passion for this incredible dream. If you are interested, contact Jeremy@FeelingGreatapp.com Today we are joined by our beloved and brilliant colleague, Dr. Jill Levitt to ask two questions: * Can the “self” be judged? * Does the “self” exist? We got quite a bit of positive feedback to a recent Ask David Podcast that included a question about Buddhism, but people said they wanted more on the topic of the “great death” of the self. Bottom line was this: * You can judge your own or someone else’s specific thoughts and actions, but you cannot judge your (or somebody else’s) “self.” * The question, “does the ‘self’ exist,” is meaningless. * The goal of therapy is not to get promoted from the “worthless” to the “worthwhile” category, but to reject these categories as having no meaning. David argues that it is impossible to feel depressed without the distortions of Overgeneralization and Labeling—that where you jump from a specific flaw or problem, like getting rejected by your boyfriend to some abstract label or judgment, like thinking you are “unloveable.” We also used the real-life example of David responding to criticisms that he was too harsh with Steven Hayes on Episode 220. We show how TEAM therapy works, and illustrate several techniques for crushing the Negative Thoughts that lead to the painful negative thoughts that including Overgeneralization and Labeling, including: * Empathy * Positive Reframing * Externalization of Voices * Be Specific * Acceptance Paradox * Feared Fantasy We also focused on the concept of “laughing enlightenment,” a key Buddhist concept, along with the “great death” of the self. When you lose your “self,” you actually lose nothing, because there was nothing there in the first place. This is a kind of cosmic joke. But you inherit the world and gain liberation from your suffering, along with great joy, and of course, sadness as well. We also summarized the thinking of Ludwig Wittgenstein, arguably the greatest philosopher of all time, and how his sudden insight when a soccer ball hit him in the head transformed the history of philosophy. He was an extremely lonely man who had numerous episodes of depression, and never attempted to publish anything when he was alive, because only a handful of students and colleagues could understand what he was trying to say. This was intensely frustrating to him, because his message was so simple, clear, and basic—and yet the great philosophers could not grasp it. The Buddha had the same problem. The book, Philosophical Investigations was published in 1950, right after his death. It is just a series of numbered paragraphs, or brief comments, on different everyday themes, like bricklayers, string, games, and so forth. It is was based on a metal box they found under his bed, which contained notes from his weekly seminars at Cambridge. Many people, including myself, consider it as the greatest book in the history of philosophy, and think of Wittgenstein as the man who killed, or ended, philosophy. According to Wikipedia, the famed British philosopher, Bertrand Russell, described Wittgenstein as "perhaps the most perfect example I have ever known of genius as traditionally conceived; passionate, profound, intense, and dominating." Although Wittgenstein did not focus emotional problems, his solution to all the problems of philosophy is very similar to cognitive therapy. Here is the parallel: You don’t try to solve the classic “free will” problem. Instead, you see through it and give it up as nonsensical, as language that's "out of gear," so to speak. Once you “see this,” and understand why it is true, it is incredibly liberating. But it can be a lonely experience, because you suddenly “see” something super-obvious that seems to be invisible to 99.9% of humans. It's as if you had a "third eye," and could see something incredible that people with only two eyes cannot see. By the same token, when you suddenly “see” that the idea that you have a “self” which could be “superior” or “inferior” is nonsensical, it is also incredibly liberating. This, in fact, is the cognitive therapy version of spiritual “enlightenment.” And that's also one of the goals of the TEAM-CBT that my collegues and I have created. Jill, Rhonda, and David
1 hr 18 min
The One You Feed
The One You Feed
Eric Zimmer|Wondery
371: Maggie Smith on Writing for Healing
Maggie Smith is a poet whose work has been widely published, anthologized, and has appeared in Best American Poetry, the New York Times, The New Yorker and elsewhere.  Her latest book, Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change, a collection of essays and quotes, is a national bestseller.  In this episode, Maggie and Eric discuss this new book and how for her, writing poetry is having a conversation with herself, problem solving, and healing on paper.  If you’d like to start out this new year restoring some balance and putting some healthy habits in place, or if you’re tired of waiting for the right circumstances to make progress towards your goals, Eric, as a behavior coach, can help you.  To book a free, no-pressure 30-minute call with Eric to see if working with him in The One You Feed Personal Transformation Program is right for you, click here. But wait – there’s more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It’s that simple and we’ll give you good stuff as a thank you! In This Interview, Maggie Smith and I discuss Writing for Healing and… * Her book, Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change * The dark time in her life that gave birth to her growth * How hope is imaginative and necessary if you’re to come out of difficulty * The role of endurance in healing * Gratitude as a practice even in the darkest times * That big life changes are often identity issues that cause us to ask “who am I now?” * Another meaning to the phrase “it’s always something!” * The reality that we pave the path of the future one step at a time * Her experience as a recovering pessimist * The difference between her poetry and her essays * The role of setting in her poetry * How it never feels good in the long run to have done the wrong thing * Post Traumatic Growth Maggie Smith Links: maggiesmithpoet.com Instagram Twitter KiwiCo: The subscription service that sends your child hands-on science, art, and geography projects each month to build confidence, creativity, and critical thinking skills. Get 30% off your first month plus free shipping on any crate line with the promo code FEED at www.KiwiCo.com FitTrack Dara Smart Scale: It accurately measures 17 vital health metrics including body composition, hydration levels, and so much more. Stop measuring weight and start measuring health with FitTrack. Go to www.getfittrack.com/wolf to get 50% off your order – plus! for a limited time, you’ll save an additional 10%!  Calm App: The app designed to help you ease stress and get the best sleep of your life through meditations and sleep stories. Join the 85 million people around the world who use Calm to get better sleep. Get 40% off a Calm Premium Subscription (a limited time offer!) by going to www.calm.com/wolf If you enjoyed this conversation with Maggie Smith on Writing for Healing, you might also enjoy these other episodes: Writing as a Path to Awakening with Albert Flynn DeSilver Power of Poetry with Ellen Bass
1 hr 1 min
Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Rick Hanson, Ph.D., Forrest Hanson
How to Cope During a Pandemic with Dr. Bruce Perry
On this timely episode, Dr. Bruce Perry joins the podcast to explore how we can limit the long-term impact of stressful events, and heal from past traumatic experiences. About Our Guest: Dr. Bruce Perry is one of the world’s leading experts on childhood trauma, and his clinical research and practice focuses on examining the long-term effects of trauma in children, adolescents, and adults. He is the Senior Fellow of The ChildTrauma Academy, and the author, with Maia Szalavitz, of _The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog._ Key Topics: 1:15: Pandemic fatigue. 4:45: Experiencing acute stressors alongside chronic stress. 7:20: Practices to help yourself de-stress. 11:30: The impact of stress on our ability to regulate ourselves. 13:30: How to limit the long-term impact of stressful events. 18:40: How we can explore traumatic material without re-traumatizing ourselves. 23:30: Avoiding helplessness, and experiencing control and agency. 25:30: Dissociation as a coping response. 31:00: Disruptions of attunement. 36:00: Caregiver fatigue, and caring for ourselves. 41:30: The pandemic’s impact on people who have been previously traumatized. 44:00: A wish for the future. 46:00: Recap _Sponsors:_ Explore your creativity at Skillshare.com/BEINGWELL and get a free trial of their Premium Membership. Want to sleep better? Try the legendary Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription. Connect with the show: * Follow us on Instagram * Follow Rick on Facebook * Follow Forrest on Facebook * Subscribe on iTunes
52 min
The Anxious Truth - REAL Help For Panic, Anxiety and Agoraphobia
The Anxious Truth - REAL Help For Panic, Anxiety and Agoraphobia
The Anxious Truth
EP 140 - We Do NOT Accept And Float Through Abuse (w/Joe Ryan)
I am often asked an important question. "How do I learn to float and accept when one person makes me anxious?"  This question is asked by people that will often explain that they experience anxiety or even panic when in the presence of a specific person or group of people.  Often, there is a history of abuse, or there is ongoing abuse of varying types (mental, emotional, or even physical).  So the question I am really being asked is, "How can I float through being with someone that has harmed me or is harming me right now?" The answer is simple.  You are not required to accept and float through abuse.  Not now.  Not ever.  I am teaching you how to become non-reactive to irrational fear.  Fear that feels real, but has no basis in reality. This is why we learn to accept that fear and float through it.  This is why we surrender to it.  Because in doing so we learn that there is no real danger, and that we no longer have to be afraid.  When in an abusive relationship, there is REAL DANGER.  REAL HARM is being done.  Your fear and your anxiety are justified!  I am not teaching you how to float through that. My old friend Joe Ryan joined me to discuss this important topic and share his experience with abusive relationships. For full show notes on this episode: https://theanxioustruth.com/140 My books, podcast, and social media links: https://theanxioustruth.com/links Music Credit: "Afterglow" by Ben Drake (https://facebook.com/BenDrakeMusic) with permission --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theanxioustruth/support
29 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
#181 Stop Avoiding Stuff with Matt Boone
Show notes: In today’s world, it’s easy to stay on-the-go. Sometimes, on-the-go behaviors are necessary and functional. But often we engage in these behaviors to avoid discomfort. In this episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Jill and Matt Boone, co-author of Stop Avoiding Stuff, discuss avoidant behavior and how to address it with skills from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Make a committed action and join us in this episode to learn more about what you might be avoiding and how to respond instead! Listen and Learn: Jill and Debbie’s personal encounters with “doom scrolling” and other behaviors that feel good in the moment but cost us in the long-run Matt’s breakdown of what his book, Stop Avoiding Stuff, is about and how you can benefit from it Why Matt decided to write about avoidance in a digestible (bathroom-book) format About Matt’s professional understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  Other places where Matt can train you in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy How to effectively use your understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to practice the skills in Matt's book  Why Matt’s accessible explanations of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy are particularly useful right now The inside-scoop on what’s inside Matt's book   Practical advice on how to identify and become more mindful of your own avoidant behaviors  Exercises for practicing awareness and willingness right now!  How Matt came to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and what role it plays in his personal life Resources: Matt’s book, Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work  Jill’s books, Be Mighty and The Big Book of ACT Metaphors  Matt’s webinar on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  Sign up for POTC’s First Annual Wise Minds Summit: How to Adapt and Thrive in Today’s Challenging Times About Matt Boone: Matt Boone is a social worker, psychotherapist, and public speaker who specializes in translating mental health concepts for the general public. He is the co-author, with Jennifer Gregg and Lisa Coyne, of Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work. He is the director of programming and outreach at the student mental health services of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, where he’s an instructor in psychiatry.  At Lyra Health, a mental health tech startup, he led the clinical development of Lyra’s mental health coaching program and gave talks on subjects like stress and stigma to audiences at Facebook, Uber, and Genentech. At Cornell University, he oversaw the development of Let's Talk, an outreach program to underserved students that has since been replicated at nearly 100 colleges and universities.   He is an Association of Contextual Behavioral Science peer-reviewed acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) trainer and a former consultant for the VA ACT for Depression training rollout. He regularly provides ACT trainings for professionals and the general public.  He lives in Little Rock with his wife, cat, and guitars, and he loves talking about mental health with people who think psychotherapy and self-help are a bit cringy. Find out more about Matt on his website, matthewsboone.com.    Related Episodes: Episode 180. Choosing to Live Your Values with Benji Schoendorff Episode 121. Be Mighty: An Episode for Stressed Out, Worried Women with Dr. Jill Stoddard Episode 116. Building a Meaningful, Values-based Life with Dr. Jenna LeJeune Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes      Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran
56 min
Therapy Chat
Therapy Chat
Laura Reagan, LCSW-C
261: Understanding The Process Psychedelic Somatic Trauma Therapy with Saj Razvi
Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In this week's episode, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C resumes part two of her interview with Saj Razvi, LPC, a clinician and director of education for the Psychedelic Somatic Institute. Listen in for a fascinating discussion on how psychedelics can help us go deeper in the process of healing trauma. Saj explains how psychedelics help us access different states of consciousness and why this matters in therapy for complex trauma. He explains the various models of psychedelic-assisted trauma therapy and how Psychedelic Somatic Institute teaches therapists to legally provide psychotherapy to clients using psychedelic medicine in private practice settings, and how this contributes to greater access to these healing medicines than has been available previously. * Register here (affiliate link) for a webinar to learn more about PSI's training * Read the White Paper that was recently published in the Journal of Psychedelic Psychiatry * Check out the PSI website: https://psychedelicsomatic.org * Listen to episode 218, Laura's interview with Dr. Craig Heacock on his work in the MAPS studies with MDMA. * Sign up to be the first to know when registration for Laura's Trauma Therapist Consultation groups opens in February, 2021! Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button. Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here. Podcast produced by Pete Bailey - https://petebailey.net/audio
47 min
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Kimberley Quinlan, LMFT
Ep. 173: Things to Know When Starting Therapy
Welcome back to another episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast. Today I would like to discuss with you a question that comes up quite a lot when I am starting with a new client. So often my clients will say to me "What can I expect during my first session?" I want to share with you what I tell my clients about the things to know when starting therapy. The first thing I say to my clients is that your brain can change. You may have a disorder that was inherited or triggered by a certain event, but the good news is that by changing your behavior, you can actually change your brain. The second thing I say is that no matter your mental health struggle, there is a science proven way to treat that disorder. We have evidence based treatments and you can absolutely can get better. Thirdly, I tell my clients that no matter what struggles they are going through, it is not their fault. This is not something they asked to have happen. We are going to move away from assigning blame and move towards self-compassion. The fourth thing I would say is that you should not enjoy coming to see me. The work can be really hard and it will mean facing your fears, so if you are enjoying coming to see me then we may need to look at the reasons why. The goal is to actually give my clients the tools they need so that they do not need me anymore. Finally I tell my clients that they need to be prepared to do the hard work. There will be lots of homework and a lot of facing your fears, but nothing changes if they are not willing to do the work. I always remind them that it is a beautiful day to do those hard things. If you get a moment, please go over to wherever you listen to podcasts, whether that be Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, Podbean, and leave an honest review. Tell me how you feel about it, whether it's helping you, what you'd like to see. We are going to give away a pair of Beats headphones of your choice of color once we hit a thousand reviews! ERP School, BFRB School and Mindfulness School for OCD are open for purchase. Click here for more information. Additional exciting news! ERP School is now CEU approved which means that it is an accredited course for therapists and mental health professionals to take towards their continuing education credit hours. Please click here for more information. Ep. 173 Transcript: Guys, I am so grateful to have you with me today. I know your time is incredibly precious and valuable, and so I'm so happy to just be with you. How are you doing? Just checking in. How is everybody? It is well and truly 2021. Lots and lots of happening in the world. Lots and lots of changes. I'm just wrapping my head around them all. In this new year, I made a deal with myself to spend a little bit more time on social media, which is so funny because I think most people were saying, “No, I think I'd like to spend less time.” I'm actually saying, “No, I'd like to spend more time on social media.” I hang out a lot on Instagram and on the Facebook group called CBT School Campus or on my Facebook page. I promised myself I'd spend more time there because I'm realizing after last year that I felt really disconnected to you guys and I really wanted to get back into feeling connected. I have loved it. If you're on Instagram, go over and follow me @kimberleyquinlan, or you can go over to the Facebook group. It's CBT School Campus, or my Facebook is Kimberly Quinlan with CBT School after it. That being said, I just wanted to let you know that today, I wanted to chat with you about something I have not talked about, but I thought it would be a really great topic. A lot of people in the new year have been reaching out, looking for clinical services – help for OCD, help for anxiety, help for an eating disorder, or help for a BFRB. We love helping people. I have a great staff of seven licensed therapists who all treat the same disorders that I do. It's just been so wonderful to see all the new clients and people coming in really ready to get help. It really came across my mind in that one of the questions new patients and clients have is: What should I expect in the first session? What does the first session look like? What would you tell me in the first session? I thought this would be a great topic to talk to you guys about. So I want to share with you the five things I tell every single client or patient in their first session. Are you ready? Let's do it. Once I have introduced myself and they've introduced themselves and they tell me a little bit about their struggles and what they're wanting to work on, I, at some point in the session, are going to tell them I'll do a thorough assessment. But I will, at some point, either at the beginning or at the end or somewhere, wherever it's most appropriate, share with them one major piece of good news. 1. Your brain can change. Even if you have a disorder that may be is hereditary, has been passed down from generation to generation, or you have a disorder that was triggered by a certain event, or you have a disorder or a problem that was triggered by societal expectations, such as eating disorders, I always share with my patients and clients the great news, which is you can change your brain. In some cases, for those of us who have anxiety, even though your brain might be firing away, setting off the alarm bells all day long, “Danger, danger, danger,” you can change the way your brain reacts to these misfires. Now, you can't do it by simply trying to change your thoughts. We know that. Changing thoughts sometimes can be very, very important. I'm not going to deny that. It's an important piece of depression work. It's an important piece of, like I said, eating disorder work and so forth for everybody. But the cool thing here is more importantly, by changing your behaviors, you can change your brain. By changing the way you react to fear, you can change your brain. You can connect parts of your brains that weren't connecting. You can strengthen parts of your brain that is weak or they're not connecting and the connection isn't so strong. Your brain can change, and this is good news. This is great news. When we found this out in science, we all had a big party because it was really reinforcing that if you do a scan of someone pretreatment of their brain, and then you did a scan of their brain post-treatment, we would be able to see the changes in their brain, and this is really cool. 2. If you have OCD or a phobia, generalized anxiety, panic disorder, social anxiety, health, anxiety, hair pulling, skin picking, and eating disorder, any of these, any of the mental health issues, that there is a science proven way to treat your disorder. This is good news. I fill you with hope by saying, I understand that what you're going through is really painful, but the good news is, we have scientific evidence to prove that we're on the right track and we're going to be administering the correct treatment. If you have OCD, the science proven treatment is exposure and response prevention. If you have hair pulling, skin picking or nail biting, the science proven treatment is habit reversal training. If you have depression or an eating disorder, the science proven treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy. If you have health anxiety, you're again going to have a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy with the focus being exposure and response prevention, same goes for phobias, same goes for social anxiety. All of these, we're going to, let’s say the frosting on top is that we're also going to apply science proven techniques, such as mindfulness and self-compassion. This is not woo-woo stuff here. This is science. We have tons of evidence to show that you can get better, that your disorder isn't a mystery. Thank goodness. Imagine back in the sixties if you had OCD, at that point, or even the seventies, there was no treatment for OCD that was proven. If you had OCD, you were told “Good luck.” A…
19 min
Unapologetically Sensitive
Unapologetically Sensitive
Patricia Young
101 Everything Is Love; I Love Myself with Sarah Buino, LCSW
TITLE Everything is Love; I Love Myself GUEST Sarah Buino, LCSW EPISODE OVERVIEW In a culture that values and rewards productivity, it can be challenging for the Highly Sensitive Person, who thrives at being vs. doing. Sarah talks about coming to fully love herself. We talk about trauma training, boundaries, developmental trauma. We talk about the gifts and challenges of living during COVID. Sarah talks about her Kundalini Awakening, and we talk about the spiritual bypass. GUEST Sarah Buino, LCSW, CADC, RDDP, CDWF is a therapist, teacher, speaker, and podcaster. She is a NARM Therapist and Certified Daring Way Facilitator, teaches at Loyola University, and hosts two podcasts: Conversations with a Wounded Healer and Transforming Trauma. She owns a group psychotherapy practice in Chicago. PODCAST HOST Patricia is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, and Coach. She knows what it’s like to feel like an outcast, misfit, and truthteller. Learning about the trait of being a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP), helped Patricia rewrite her history with a deeper understanding, appreciation, and a sense of self-compassion. She created the podcast Unapologetically Sensitive to help other HSPs know that they aren’t alone, and that being an HSP has amazing gifts, and some challenges. Patricia works online globally working individually with people, and she teaches Online Courses for HSPs that focus on understanding what it means to be an HSP, self-care, self-compassion, boundaries, perfectionism, mindfulness, communication, and creating a lifestyle that honors us. LINKS Sarah’s Links Facebook--https://www.facebook.com/HeadHeartTherapy Instagram--https://www.instagram.com/headhearttherapy Facebook--https://www.facebook.com/WoundedHealr Twitter--https://twitter.com/HeadHeart_Chi Twitter--https://twitter.com/WoundedHealr LinkedIn--https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarahbuino/ Website-- www.headhearttherapy.com James Masterson Roru/Woru— https://www.contemporarypsychotherapy.org/volume-4-issue-2-winter-2012/living-between-rewarding-and-withdrawing-paradigms-of-experience/ The Nap Ministry-- https://thenapministry.wordpress.com/ Living between rewarding and withdrawing paradigms-- https://www.contemporarypsychotherapy.org/volume-4-issue-2-winter-2012/living-between-rewarding-and-withdrawing-paradigms-of-experience/ NARM—Neuro-Affective Relational Model https://narmtraining.com/what-is-narm/ Sarah Buino Episode 50: Boundaries—I want to be the one to stop it here-- https://unapologeticallysensitive.com/episode-50/ Episode 100—Sarah Buino interviews Patricia Young-- https://unapologeticallysensitive.com/episode-100-sarah-buino-interviews-patricia-young/ Patricia’s Links HSP Online Course--https://unapologeticallysensitive.com/hsp-online-groups/ Unapologetically Sensitive Merchandise-- https://patriciayounglcsw.com/product-category/merchandise/ Online HSP Course Materials (no group included) https://patriciayounglcsw.com/product-category/hsp-classes/ Podcast Survey-- https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe-fAYIyFgVb0VHlDorfm8ZdXClCcYDlv0cSP2RXZSZY16SIQ/viewform Receive the top 10 most downloaded episodes of the podcast-- https://www.subscribepage.com/e6z6e6 Sign up for the Newsletter-- https://www.subscribepage.com/y0l7d4 To write a review in itunes: * click on this link https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/unapologetically-sensitive/id1440433481?mt=2 * select “listen on Apple Podcasts” * chose “open in itunes” * choose “ratings and reviews” * click to rate the number of starts * click “write a review” Website--www.unapologeticallysensitive.com Facebook-- https://www.facebook.com/Unapologetically-Sensitive-2296688923985657/ Closed/Private Facebook group Unapologetically Sensitive-- https://www.facebook.com/groups/2099705880047619/ Closed/Private Facebook group for therapists and healers-- https://www.facebook.com/groups/208565440423641/ Instagram-- https://www.instagram.com/unapologeticallysensitive/ Youtube-- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOE6fodj7RBdO3Iw0NrAllg/videos?view_as=subscriber Tik Tok-- https://www.tiktok.com/@hsppodcast e-mail-- unapologeticallysensitive@gmail.com Show hashtag--#unapologeticallysensitive Shelly Aaron Productions—shellyaaronproductions@gmail.com Music-- Gravel Dance by Andy Robinson www.andyrobinson.com
58 min
Anxiety Slayer™ with Shann and Ananga
Anxiety Slayer™ with Shann and Ananga
Shann Vander Leek & Ananga Sivyer
Be Mighty with Jill A. Stoddard PhD
#525: Shann is speaking with Dr. Jill Stoddard about her new book, Be Mighty: A Woman's Guide to Liberation from Anxiety, Worry, and Stress Using Mindfulness and Acceptance.   Dr. Jill Stoddard’s Be Mighty leads you on a bold quest to gain a deeper understanding of your anxiety by exploring your own “origin story”—how your early experiences led to thoughts and behaviors that may have offered comfort and protection at one time, but are now keeping you from living your best life. After reading this book you’ll learn to respond to present-day triggers in a new way, making choices from a more conscious, values-driven place.   Jill A. Stoddard, PhD, is founder and director of The Center for Stress and Anxiety Management, a multisite outpatient clinic in San Diego, CA. She specializes in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety and related issues. She lives in San Diego with her husband, two kids, and two French bulldogs.   About a year ago I had the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Stephen Hayes, Originator of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. He pioneered ACT to help people with mental health issues feel fully, think freely, and live lives that reflect the qualities they choose.   Today Jill and I discuss how ACT can support women who often struggle with health anxiety and anxiety attacks.   We discuss the Anxiety Triumvirate   * Intolerance of uncertainty * A lack of perceived control * An overinflated sense of responsibility Jill shares how we can cultivate Might through mindfulness and acceptance to help us move through our anxiety   We explore the cycle of anxious uncertainty: uncertainty + anxiety + get my fix + temporary relief + more questions and back to the beginning of the cycle with uncertainty.   And finally, we dig into the questions we can ask about ourselves (and our anxiety) to help us live with more confidence   Be Mighty Acronym * Breathe * Explore present experience * Make space for feelings * Impartially observe thoughts * Give self-compassion * Highlight values * Take action * Yell from the rooftops   You can get a copy of Jill's new book, Be Mighty wherever books are sold.
32 min
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
Tammy Sollenberger
IFS and Masculinity and Jericho Circles with Steve Spitzer and Glenn Williams
On today's episode, I chat with Steve Spitzer and Glenn Williams. Steve, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Suffolk University in Boston, has taught, researched, and written on crime, justice and social control for three decades. He is Level 2 IFS trained and has presented his use of the IFS model inside prisons at multiple IFS annual conferences and has written articles in the IFS newsletter, The Outlook. In 2002, he founded the Jericho Circle Project, a non-profit organization that seeks to 'bring down the walls' by creating men's support groups in correctional facilities. Since the project began, almost 1000 incarcerated men have sat in Jericho Circles in county, state, and federal correctional institutions in Massachusetts, Maine, and Rhode Island. Glenn participated in the Jericho groups when he was incarcerated for 21 years and later met Steve in a different context. Glenn now 'pays it forward' with his organization, Our House Boston. Glenn is Level One IFS trained and is passionate about spreading the word about our True Essence, especially to black men in urban settings. Glenn is a reentry advocate and community investor who works with various individuals, families, organizations and businesses to raise awareness about and create solutions to the challenges of incarceration and prisoner reintegration. This conversation is AMAZING. I cannot convey this in words. Here are some themes: 'Self' Discovery Masculinity Men's work inside prisons, power of vulnerability, and speaking for parts 'Climbing out of the man box'/Taking off masks The importance of power in manliness for Black Men Glenn states, "Who I pretend to be (what my community and society says I need to be in order to survive) and my Essence are not the same thing." And, "IFS offers the opportunity for Self Discovery and Self Exploration (inside and outside of prison). Discovering that my shame and guilt are parts of me and do not have to define who I am at my core." To find more about Jericho circle go to https://jerichocircle.org/ Check out this 90 minute documentary on the nature of their group work that was filmed at California State Prison Sacramento. That film, produced by the group that initially mentored them in the work (Inside Circle), will give you a taste of the kind of work done (albeit at a somewhat higher level of intensity than is typical of Jericho Circle’s groups) on their weekends. Video is found here: https://www.topic.com/the-work To register for the Heirloom Summit on Feb 24-26 and get a special discount as a listener of the podcast: https://www.blacktherapistsrock.com/Products/Products.aspx I'd love to connect with you at ifstammy on Instagram and Twitter and on The One Inside Facebook page. Enjoy!
56 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu