Reveal
Reveal
Oct 24, 2020
Remembering a White Supremacist Coup
51 min

On the eve of a contentious election, Reveal looks back to the nearly forgotten election of 1898 in Wilmington, North Carolina. A coup d’etat gave birth to much of the structural racism that still plagues our nation today. This suppressed history left a deep scar that the local community is still working to overcome. 

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Trump, Inc.
Trump, Inc.
WNYC Studios
Midnight Regulations
This story was co-published with ProPublica. Sign up for email updates from Trump, Inc. to get the latest on our investigations. Six days after President Donald Trump lost his bid for reelection, the U.S. Department of Agriculture notified food safety groups that it was proposing a regulatory change to speed up chicken factory processing lines, a change that would allow companies to sell more birds. An earlier USDA effort had broken down on concerns that it could lead to more worker injuries and make it harder to stop germs like salmonella. Ordinarily, a change like this would take about two years to go through the cumbersome legal process of making new federal regulations. But the timing has alarmed food and worker safety advocates, who suspect the Trump administration wants to rush through this rule in its waning days. Even as Trump and his allies officially refuse to concede the Nov. 3 election, the White House and federal agencies are hurrying to finish dozens of regulatory changes before Joe Biden is inaugurated on Jan. 20. The rules range from long-simmering administration priorities to last-minute scrambles and affect everything from creature comforts like showerheads and clothes washers to life-or-death issues like federal executions and international refugees. They impact everyone from the most powerful, such as oil drillers, drugmakers and tech startups, to the most vulnerable, such as families on food stamps, transgender people in homeless shelters, migrant workers and endangered species. ProPublica is tracking those regulations as they move through the rule-making process. Every administration does some version of last-minute rule-making, known as midnight regulations, especially with a change in parties. It’s too soon to say how the Trump administration’s tally will stack up against predecessors. But these final weeks are solidifying conservative policy objectives that will make it harder for the Biden administration to advance its own agenda, according to people who track rules developed by federal agencies. “The bottom line is the Trump administration is trying to get things published in the Federal Register, leaving the next administration to sort out the mess,” said Matthew Kent, who tracks regulatory policy for left-leaning advocacy group Public Citizen. “There are some real roadblocks to Biden being able to wave a magic wand on these.” In some instances the Trump administration is using shortcuts to get more rules across the finish line, such as taking less time to accept and review public feedback. It’s a risky move. On the one hand, officials want to finalize rules so that the next administration won’t be able to change them without going through the process all over again. On the other, slapdash rules may contain errors, making them more vulnerable to getting struck down in court. The Trump administration is on pace to finalize 36 major rules in its final three months, similar to the 35 to 40 notched by the previous four presidents, according to Daniel Perez, a policy analyst at the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center. In 2017, Republican lawmakers struck down more than a dozen Obama-era rules using a fast-track mechanism called the Congressional Review Act. That weapon may be less available for Democrats to overturn Trump’s midnight regulations if Republicans keep control of the Senate, which will be determined by two Georgia runoffs. Still, a few GOP defections could be enough to kill a rule with a simple majority. “This White House is not likely to be stopping things and saying on principle elections have consequences, let’s respect the voters’ decision and not rush things through to tie the next guys’ hands,” said Susan Dudley, who led the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Office of Management and Budget at the end of the George W. Bush administration. “One concern is the rules are rushed so they didn’t have adequate analysis or public comment, and that’s what we’re seeing.” The Trump White House didn’t respond to requests for comment on which regulations it’s aiming to finish before Biden’s inauguration. The Biden transition team also didn’t respond to questions about which of Trump’s parting salvos the new president would prioritize undoing. Many of the last-minute changes would add to the heap of changes throughout the Trump administration to pare back Obama-era rules and loosen environmental and consumer protections, all in the name of shrinking the government’s role in the economy. “Our proposal today greatly furthers the Trump administration’s regulatory reform efforts, which together have already amounted to the most aggressive effort to reform federal regulations of any administration,” Brian Harrison, the chief of staff for the Department of Health and Human Services, said on a conference call with reporters the day after the election. Harrison was unveiling a new proposal to automatically purge regulations that are more than 10 years old unless the agency decides to keep them. For that proposal to become finalized before Jan. 20 would be an exceptionally fast turnaround. But Harrison left no doubt about that goal. “The reason we're doing this now is because,” he said, “we at the department are trying to go as fast as we can in hopes of finalizing the rule before the end of the first term.” Read Isaac Arnsdorf's full print story at ProPublica. Track more of the Trump administration's midnight regulations here.
18 min
Criminal
Criminal
Criminal & Radiotopia
Episode 153: The Max Headroom Incident
One Sunday night in November 1987, something very odd happened in the middle of the nine o’clock news in Chicago. As one television viewer said, it felt like someone threw "a brick through your window." A television engineer said it felt like "a home invasion." And a little boy said it was "very, very funny." Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow. Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for our newsletter, The Accomplice. If you’d like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions. For a transcript of this episode, send an email to hello@thisiscriminal.com. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Sponsors: * Acorn TV Escape to Britain and beyond without leaving your seat. Try Acorn TV free for 30 days, by going to Acorn.tv and use the promo code CRIMINAL * Arm & Hammer Go to armandhammer.com/bounty and get $4 off your box of quick-absorbing AbsorbX, and have a nice, dry day. * Article Get $50 off your first order of $100 or more at Article.com/criminal * Better Help Get 10 percent off your first month with discount code criminal at BetterHelp.com/criminal * Calm Get a special limited time promotion of 40% off Calm Premium subscription at calm.com/CRIMINAL * Honey Get Honey for free at Join Honey.com/CRIMINAL. * Quip Go to quip.com/CRIMINAL to get your first refill free. * Rothy’s Check out all the amazing shoes and bags available right now at Rothys.com/CRIMINAL * Simplisafe Protect your home today and get free shipping at SimpliSafe.com/CRIMINAL * Squarespace Try Squarespace.com/criminal for a free trial and when you’re ready to launch, use the offer code CRIMINAL to save 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain. * Sun Basket Go to sunbasket.com/criminal and enter promo code criminal at checkout for $35 off your order. * Theragun Go to Theragun.com/CRIMINAL to try Theragun for 30 days * Virtue Labs Visit VirtueLabs.com and use the code Criminal to receive 20% off plus free shipping on your Virtue order. * Ziprecruiter See for yourself how ZipRecruiter makes hiring faster and easier. Try it now for free at ZipRecruiter.com/criminal.
26 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu