What do you value?
Play • 19 min

The conditions we live in under COVID-19 have put many of our goals in conflict — parenting vs work, comforting our loved ones vs social distancing, and more. They can feel like impossible choices in chaotic times. But there's a way to feel more confident in making tough decisions: getting clear about what we value. What's more, our present circumstances might actually offer us the opportunity to make choices that move us closer to the values we want to live by.

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Oncology Nursing Society
Episode 139: How CAR and Other T Cells Are Revolutionizing Cancer Treatment
ONS member Cecily Snyder, BSN, RN, OCN®, BMTCN®, transplant case manager of the blood and marrow transplantation program at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha and member of the Metro Omaha ONS Chapter, joins Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss T-cell therapy and how it’s changed approaches to cancer treatment and patient management for oncology nurses. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.5 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by January 22, 2022. The planners and faculty for this episode have no conflicts to disclose, and the episode has no commercial support. ONS is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Check out these resources from today’s episode: * Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. * Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 1: Experiences With CAR T-Cell Therapy * ONS Voice article: Nurses Help Patients Weather the Storm of CAR T-Cell Therapy * ONS Voice article: The Evolving Landscape of Cell Transplant Therapy in Cancer Care * Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing supplement on CAR T-cell therapy * ONS course: Immuno-Oncology for the Oncology Nurse Case Study—CAR T-Cell Therapy * American Cancer Society’s information on types of stem cell and bone marrow transplants * American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy * Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research * Clinicaltrials.gov studies on CAR T-cell therapy * Leukemia and Lymphoma Society resources on CAR T-cell therapy * National Marrow Donor Program
26 min
PsychCrunch
PsychCrunch
The British Psychological Society Research Digest
Ep 23: Whose psychology is it anyway? Making psychological research more representative
This is Episode 23 of PsychCrunch, the podcast from the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest. In this episode, Emily Reynolds, staff writer at Research Digest, explores modern psychology’s relationship with race and representation. It’s well-known that psychology has a generalisability problem, with studies overwhelmingly using so-called “WEIRD” participants: those who are Western and educated and from industrialised, rich and democratic societies. But how does that shape the assumptions we make about participants of different racial identities or cultures? And how can top-tier psychology journals improve diversity among not only participants but also authors and editors? Our guests, in order of appearance, are Dr Bobby Cheon, Assistant Professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and Dr Steven O. Roberts, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. Episode credits: Presented and produced by Emily Reynolds. Script edits by Matthew Warren. Mixing and editing by Jeff Knowler. PsychCrunch theme music by Catherine Loveday and Jeff Knowler. Art work by Tim Grimshaw. Research mentioned in this episode includes: * How USA-Centric Is Psychology? An Archival Study of Implicit Assumptions of Generalizability of Findings to Human Nature Based on Origins of Study Samples * Racial Inequality in Psychological Research: Trends of the Past and Recommendations for the Future * Toward a psychology of Homo sapiens: Making psychological science more representative of the human population
14 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
103. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy by James Paul Gee
What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy is a book that I read early in my education research quest. At the time, I thought that it had interesting points to make, but I was unclear on quite how to react to it. After several more years of reading and research, it's clear to me that this book is deeply flawed. First of all, the author redefines "literacy" in a very strange way. He takes any form of semiotic system to count as a "type" of literacy. So, for example, if you know how to use a smartphone, then you are "literate" in the layout, symbols, and conventions of smartphone user interface. This is obviously not the kind of literacy that most people are interested on or concerned about, and it is less valuable than "conventional" literacy, partly because of barrier to entry (learning to read is relatively hard, learning to use a phone is relatively easy) and partly because of utility. Secondly, he coins a lot of new terminology for no apparent reason. During the recording I've had to translate some of his terms into more ordinary language, including the usual technical terms rather than his special ones. His terminology only serves to obscure his message and make it seem as if there is more content here than there really is. Finally, and most importantly, his central point is misguided. He essentially says that learning a subject is mostly about socially getting on in that world - knowing how to get on with other artists, mathematicians, surgeons, or whatever other skill "community", depending on the domain. However, this completely overlooks the glaring difference in difficulty between getting to know social conventions and attitudes of a subculture and learning the requisite knowledge and skills in order to be useful and productive in that domain, let alone to actually understand what is being said by other practitioners. The former takes a matter of weeks or months of acculturation, and the latter years or even decades of dedication. If we focus on the social context of knowledge rather than the knowledge itself, to coin a phrase, it would be like making beautiful light fittings for a house that you haven't built - pointless in the absence of the larger task that is left undone. Enjoy the episode. *** RELATED EPISODES Cognitive science (general): 19. Seven Myths about Education by Daisy Christodoulou; 52. How We Learn by Benedict Carey; 79. What Learning Is; 80. The Chimp Paradox by Steve Peters; 81a. The Myth of Learning Styles; 81b. on the Expertise Reversal Effect; 82. Memorable Teaching by Pepps McCrea; 85. Why Don't Students Like School? by Dan Willingham; 86. Learning as information compression Cognitive science (literacy-related): 41. What Reading Does for the Mind by Keith Stanovich and Annie Cunningham; 91. Vocabulary Development by Steven Stahl; 93. Closing the Vocabulary Gap by Alex Quigley; 95. The Reading Mind by Dan Willingham Expertise: 20. Genius Explained by Michael Howe; 22. The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle; 24. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell; 49. The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin; 97. The Polymath by Waqas Ahmed; 98. Range by David Epstein Games and play (including computer games): 34. Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal; 35. Minds on Fire by Mark Carnes; 36. Fun, Play, and Games; 37. A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster Other fads / critical reviews: 42. Do Schools Kill Creativity by Sir Ken Robinson; 53. Brain-based Learning by Eric Jensen; 59, 60 on Brain Training; 62. Brainstorming makes you less creative; 65. Beyond the Hole in the Wall (on Sugata Mitra); 71. Visible Learning by John Hattie; 81. on Learning Styles; 87. Experiential Learning; 88. The Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching
1 hr 30 min
Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting
Ask Lisa: The Psychology of Parenting
Dr. Lisa Damour/Good Trouble Productions
24: My Daughter Is Questioning Her Gender. What Do I Do?
A single mom writes in feeling worried because her daughter is questioning her gender. Dr. Lisa explains what we understand about gender identity and sexual orientation, and offers advice on what to do when you are at an impasse with your child. Parents often feel they need to drive the bus on getting to a desired outcome, but that's not usually the best approach. Lisa and Reena talk about how to think with your child about complex and delicate topics, and Lisa explains what teenagers really respect in adults. She also discusses research she uncovered about the parent-child relationship while writing Untangled that might surprise you. Lisa's 10/7/20 book review in The New York Times: 'Tomboy’ Looks at Gender Roles, and Role-Playing, Through the Ages BOOK GIVEAWAY: Dr. Lisa Damour’s “Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood.” Enter to win one of 3 copies being given away by @asklisapodcast. 1. Follow us on Instagram and/or Facebook @asklisadamour 2. Tag a friend and leave a comment (on Instagram/Facebook) 3. Enter as many times as you'd like 4. For U.S. residents only (Give-away is not sponsored or endorsed by Instagram/Facebook. It will close at 11:59 p.m. EST on 2/1/21. Winners will be chosen at random and will be notified within 24 hours of the end of the give-away. Books will be mailed to the winners.) Additional resources: https://www.drlisadamour.com/ Ask Lisa is produced by Www.GoodTroubleProductions.com Be sure to follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @AskLisaPodcast, @LDamour, @ReenaNinan
28 min
Hormonal
Hormonal
Clue BioWink
Who you gonna call? Mythbusters!
This season on Hormonal we’ve learned a lot about birth control. From the origin of the pill, to how side effects can be beneficial, to the history and future of Reproductive Justice. But that doesn’t mean that there isn’t more to learn, especially when it comes to those pesky myths that just never seem to completely disappear. This week on the Hormonal podcast, we are assembling a super squad of science-backed Mythbusters. They’re ready to tackle questions from real users like you. On the mythbusting squad we’re welcoming back Dr. Lynae Brayboy, Clue’s Chief Medical Officer–and also joining us is Amanda Shea, Clue’s Head of Science, and Dr. Hajnalka Hejja, Clue’s Science Lead for Product. "It feels like it's constantly being reinforced that we should have an exactly 28-day cycle that comes at the exact day we expect, month after month after month. And then it's completely not true." For more information on today’s episode visit helloclue.com/hormonal. And to find out how to support the work here at Clue, go to Clue.Plus. Episode Links * HelloClue.com: The birth control implant: myths and misconceptions * HelloClue.com: Antibiotics and Birth Control: Myths and Facts * HelloClue.com: How to use Clue if you’re on the hormonal birth control pill * HelloClue.com: The top 3 PMS myths * HelloClue.com: 36 superstitions about periods from around the world * HelloClue.com: Tampons: questions & misconceptions * HelloClue.com: Can you swim on your period? * HelloClue.com: The myth of moon phases and menstruation
36 min
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