Follow The Money
Follow The Money
Sep 10, 2020
A Plan for Planet A
Play episode · 59 min
Fight for Planet A is the newest TV series from Craig Reucassel, a three-part documentary exploring the challenges of climate change, where our energy comes from, the health effects of transport and the carbon footprint of what we eat. It offers practical solutions for people to implement at home but as Craig points out, action on climate change by householders is not enough. Governments and big corporate giants also have to do their bit. But the picture looks grim. Australia is among the world's top 20 polluters and when you factor in emissions from coal and gas exports that are shipped overseas our carbon footprint triples. Yet as part of its Covid Economic plan, the government is planning a gas-led recovery. Recorded live on September 9, 2020 as part of The Australia Institute's Webinar of a Pandemic series. The Australia Institute @theAusInstitute //
Host and Producer: Jennifer Macey // @jennifermacey Guests: Craig Reucassel @craigreucassel // Richie Merzian Climate & Energy Director at the Australia Institute @richiemerzian // Leanne Minshull Director The Australia Institute Tasmania @leanneminshull. Music: Pulse and Thrum.
Politics with Michelle Grattan
Politics with Michelle Grattan
The Conversation
Politics with Michelle Grattan: economist Danielle Wood on Australia's 'blokey' budget
Mick Tsikas/AAP In his budget reply, Anthony Albanese said women have suffered most during the pandemic, but were reduced to a footnote in the budget. He promised a Labor government would undertake a generous reshaping of the childcare subsidy to enable more women to join the workforce or to work more hours. This week, Michelle Grattan talks to Grattan Institute CEO Danielle Wood who, in writing for the Australian Financial Review, described the budget as “blokey”: “We look at those areas that have received direct support - construction… the energy sector, defence, manufacturing, all of those areas where the government has put direct money into a particular sector - they tend to be male dominated sectors. "And actually often they’re not the ones that have taken the hardest hit in this recession. "The sectors that have been hit really hard: hospitality, tourism, the arts, recreation, administrative services tend to be actually slightly more female dominated… we really don’t see any direct assistance for those sectors in the budget. ” When asked about the budget generally Wood, the president of the Economic Society of Australia, is concerned all the eggs have been put into the “private sector basket”. “If it doesn’t pay off, then we may see unemployment sticking around for a long time to come.” In the Grattan institute’s report, co-authored by Wood, and titled Cheaper Childcare, Wood endorsed reform in a similar vein to Albanese’s proposal. “Our numbers suggest that for every dollar that you spend reforming the subsidy…you return more than two dollars in additional GDP,” she says. “The Labor reforms… you’re probably talking, if its $2 billion a year… something in the vicinity of $5 billion return each year for GDP.” Additional audio A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive. Michelle Grattan does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.
17 min
Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
Policy Forum
Can Australia close the gap?
On this Democracy Sausage Extra, we talk to Indigenous experts Professor Ian Anderson AO and Dr Virginia Marshall about the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap, the importance of shared decision-making, and whether Australia is taking meaningful steps towards genuine reconciliation. Will the commitment of governments to sharing decision-making with Indigenous Australians through the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap be a turning point for Indigenous health and wellbeing? What does this agreement mean for the broader reconciliation agenda? And with little for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the recent Federal Budget, will governments ensure progress is supported financially in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by Dr Virginia Marshall, the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow at the Australian National University (ANU), and Professor Ian Anderson AO, former Indigenous health practitioner, senior public servant, and now Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Student and University Experience) at ANU. Ian Anderson AO is Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Student and University Experience) at The Australian National University. Before that, he spent three years leading Closing the Gap negotiations on behalf of the Australian government. Ian is a Palawa man from the northwest coast of Tasmania. Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with The Australian National University’s School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is a Wiradjuri Nyemba woman from New South Wales. Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
55 min
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