Follow The Money
Follow The Money
Jun 18, 2020
War is not a metaphor with Allan Gyngell
Play episode · 53 min
Using war as a metaphor has crept into how we talk about public policy. Misrepresenting policy issues as security problems does not solve them, yet many public policy issues are framed using this lens. We’ve had a war on drugs, wars on poverty and wars on red tape, but Australia doesn't describe what’s has been happening in Yemen as a ‘war’. To discuss how ‘securitisation’ can turn problems into threats, we spoke to Allan Gyngell and Allan Behm as part of the 'Economics of a Pandemic' webinar series.
Visit tai.org.au for our latest pandemic economic research and analysis // @theausinstitute
Host: Ebony Bennett, deputy director of the Australia Institute // @ebony_bennett
Guests:
Allan Gyngell, National President, the Australian Institute of International Affairs
Allan Behm, head of the Australia Institute's International and Security Affairs Program // @Mirandaprorsus
Producer: Jennifer Macey with help from Grace Crivellaro
Theme music is by Jonathan McFeat from Pulse and Thrum
Politics with Michelle Grattan
Politics with Michelle Grattan
The Conversation
Politics with Michelle Grattan: economist Danielle Wood on Australia's 'blokey' budget
Mick Tsikas/AAP In his budget reply, Anthony Albanese said women have suffered most during the pandemic, but were reduced to a footnote in the budget. He promised a Labor government would undertake a generous reshaping of the childcare subsidy to enable more women to join the workforce or to work more hours. This week, Michelle Grattan talks to Grattan Institute CEO Danielle Wood who, in writing for the Australian Financial Review, described the budget as “blokey”: “We look at those areas that have received direct support - construction… the energy sector, defence, manufacturing, all of those areas where the government has put direct money into a particular sector - they tend to be male dominated sectors. "And actually often they’re not the ones that have taken the hardest hit in this recession. "The sectors that have been hit really hard: hospitality, tourism, the arts, recreation, administrative services tend to be actually slightly more female dominated… we really don’t see any direct assistance for those sectors in the budget. ” When asked about the budget generally Wood, the president of the Economic Society of Australia, is concerned all the eggs have been put into the “private sector basket”. “If it doesn’t pay off, then we may see unemployment sticking around for a long time to come.” In the Grattan institute’s report, co-authored by Wood, and titled Cheaper Childcare, Wood endorsed reform in a similar vein to Albanese’s proposal. “Our numbers suggest that for every dollar that you spend reforming the subsidy…you return more than two dollars in additional GDP,” she says. “The Labor reforms… you’re probably talking, if its $2 billion a year… something in the vicinity of $5 billion return each year for GDP.” Additional audio A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive. Michelle Grattan does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.
17 min
Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
Policy Forum
The opposition in residence
The elections in New Zealand and the Australian Capital Territory delivered strong results to incumbent governments. But with Jacinda Ardern poised to govern without needing to form a coalition, and with a rising Greens vote in Canberra, what challenges are ahead for the victors? Plus we look at accountability in government and why there is no federal version of ICAC.   New Zealand’s election delivered a resounding victory to Jacinda Ardern, while in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Labor returned, the Greens grew, and the Liberals slumped. But could those strong results create challenges from inside their parties and, in the ACT’s case, their coalition partners? Analysing the election results with Professor Mark Kenny, as well as looking at public accountability from politicians, are Professor Paul Pickering and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. Professor Paul Pickering is the Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute. Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.   Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
55 min
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