Cattitude - Episode 95 Cats Are A Liquid
24 min
What you say? That's right, cats are a liquid! This week Michelle Fern welcomes Rebecca Donnelly, author of the children's book Cats Are A Liquid. Inspired by an Ig Nobel Prize-winning investigation of how cats behave like liquids, this book (including back matter on the states of matter) introduces some of the physical properties of liquids— they adapt to fit a container, they flow like fluids—and celebrates cats in all their flowing, furry glory!

EPISODE NOTES: Cats Are A Liquid with Michelle Fern
#Millennial: Pretend Adulting, Real Talk
#Millennial: Pretend Adulting, Real Talk
Millennials Andrew Sims, Laura Tee, Pamela Gocobachi
44: Thanksgiving Plans, Trump Kinda Concedes, Movie Release Changes
Just in time for Thanksgiving: Twitter launches FLEETS, Rudy Giuliani melts on live television, and Barack Obama's A Promised Land drops. Taboo word of the week is back! This week's taboo word: Biden. How are we all handling Thanksgiving this year? While the panel tries to plan a safe and enjoyable holiday, we're 👀 at the people who are having large family celebrations. We predict that the closest thing we'll ever get to a concession from Trump is this tweet (https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1331013908971261953?s=20) . What does it mean if the President kinda concedes, but recounts and court challenges are still happening? Trump really is tired of winning: not content with losing Georgia twice, he is requesting a third recount after the state certified its results last Friday. Don't fuck with Detroit: the tale of how a gridlock to certify Wayne County's election results turned into a Zoombombing good time. In happy news, Dr. Fauci confirms that Santa is immune to coronavirus, and can still make the rounds this year! Vaccine check in - are we still feeling cautiously optimistic? Laura's rage of the week: 80% of inmates in Texas county jails who died of coronavirus had not yet been convicted of a crime (https://www.vox.com/2020/11/12/21562278/jails-prisons-texas-covid-19-coronavirus-crime-prisoners-death) , and were in jail simply because they couldn't afford bail. What to say to people who say you're being "too safe" right now: Laura wants to say "fuck 'em," but Huffington Post has some (perhaps) more helpful recommendations (https://www.huffpost.com/entry/what-to-say-too-safe-coronavirus_l_5fb2f0cac5b6a46646700b2c) . Pam reports that some California counties are now on mandatory curfew, prompting us to wonder if covid only comes out after 10 PM? Universal has struck a deal with some major theatrical chains to shorten the theatrical exclusivity window, a win for everyone who prefers watching new movies from the comfort of home. This week's recommendations will keep your feeds clean, your liver busy, and your Christmas lights simple: Tweetbot (Andrew), Gingerbread Murder Scene stout by Pontoon Brewing (Laura), and smart plugs (Pam). This week's episode of #Millennial is sponsored by Rothy's (https://www.rothys.com/mill), EliteMD CBD (https://www.elitemdcbd.com/sleep and enter code REAL20 at checkout for 20% off plus free shipping), and LoveBook (https://www.lovebookonline.com/MILL for 20% off). Support #Millennial by supporting our sponsors! And in this week's installment of After Dark, available on Patreon: Surprise Bitch! victim Natalie fills us in on new parenthood during the pandemic, as well as what it's like to live in a state where it seems like the Governor wants everyone to die (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/23/us/politics/iowa-kim-reynolds-face-masks.html) . Becky reaches out to assuage Laura's fears about potentially getting away to an Airbnb for a change in scenery. Laura is still very paranoid. In preparation for Thanksgiving, we share some of the cringiest stories from around the web about other peoples' dysfunctional family gatherings. May this help prepare you for seeing your own family. Andrew reveals his dad's most haunting moment.
1 hr 12 min
Strange Animals Podcast
Strange Animals Podcast
Katherine Shaw
Episode 199: Carnivorous Sponges!
Thanks to Lorenzo for this week's topic, carnivorous sponges! How can a sponge catch and eat animals? What is its connection to the mystery of the Eltanin Antenna? Let's find out! Further reading/watching: New carnivorous harp sponge discovered in deep sea (this has a great video attached) How Nature's Deep Sea 'Antenna' Puzzled the World Asbestopluma hypogea, beautiful but deadly if you're a tiny animal: The lyre sponge, also beautiful but deadly if you're a tiny animal: The ping-pong tree sponge, also beautiful but deadly if you're a tiny animal: The so-called Eltanin antenna: A better photo of Chondrocladia concrescens, looking less like an antenna and more like a grape stem: Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I’m your host, Kate Shaw. This week we’re going to learn about carnivorous sponges, which is a suggestion from Lorenzo. When I got Lorenzo’s email, I thought “oh, neat” and added carnivorous sponges to the giant, complicated list I keep of topic suggestions from listeners and my Aunt Janice, and also animals I want to learn more about. When I noticed carnivorous sponges on the list the other day, I thought, “Wait, sponges are filter feeders. Are there even any carnivorous ones?” The answer is yes! Most sponges are filter feeders, sure, but there’s a family of sponges that are actually carnivorous. Caldorhizidae is the family, and it’s made up of deep-sea sponges that have only been discovered recently. We know there are lots more species out there because scientists have seen them during deep-sea rover expeditions without being able to study them closely. We talked about sponges way back in episode 41, with some mentions of them in episodes 64 and 168 too, but only the filter feeder kind. Let’s first learn how a filter feeder sponge eats, specifically members of the class Demosponge, since that’s the class that the family Caldorhizidae belongs to. Sponges have been around for more than half a billion years, since the Cambrian period and possibly before, and they’re still going strong. Early on, sponges evolved a simple but effective body plan and just stuck to it. Of course there are lots and lots and lots of different species with different shapes and sizes, but they almost all work the same way. Most have a skeleton, but not the kind of skeleton that you think of as an actual skeleton. They don’t have bones. The skeleton is usually made of calcium carbonate and forms a sort of dense net that’s covered with soft body tissues. The tissues are often further strengthened with small pointy structures called spicules. If you’ve ever played a game called jacks, where you bounce a ball and pick up little metal pieces between each bounce, spicules sort of resemble jacks. The sponge has lots of open pores in the outside of its body, which generally just resembles a sack or sometimes a tube. One end of the sack is attached to the bottom of the ocean, or a rock or something. The pores are lined with cells that each have a teensy structure called a flagellum, which is sort of like a tiny tail. The sponge pumps water through the pores by beating those flagella. Water flows into the sponge’s tissues, which are made up of lots of tiny connected chambers. Cells in the walls of these chambers filter out particles of food from the water, much of it microscopic, and release any waste material. The sponge doesn’t have a stomach or any kind of digestive tract, though. The cells process the food individually and pass on any extra nutrients to adjoining cells. Obviously, this body plan is really effective for filter feeding, not so effective for chasing and killing small animals to eat. The sponge you may have in your kitchen is probably synthetic or manufactured from a sponge gourd, not an actual bath sponge animal, but it’s arranged the same way. Go look at that sponge, or just imagine it, and then compare it mentally to, say, a tiger.
14 min
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