Cattitude - Episode 32 Back to School With World’s Best Cat Litter
19 min
Back-to- school time is here, and households across the country are getting ready for another busy year of classes, team practices and after-school activities. On top of an already full schedule, many parents are also pet parents who are busy taking care of their furry family members. For those of us with cats, that includes dealing with one of the more unpleasant parts of being a pet parent: cleaning the litter box. But what if we told you there was a product out there that could help you spend less time cleaning the box, and more time with your family? Michelle Fern chats with Sarah from World’s Best Cat Litter, the only litter with the concentrated power of corn, about how you can get more out of your litter, so you can think about your cat, not the box.

Questions or Comments? Send them to: michelle@petliferadio.com.

More details on this episode MP3 Podcast - Back to School With World’s Best Cat Litter with Michelle Fern
Good Kids
Good Kids
Lemonada Media
When in Doubt, Shake It Out
Kati Morton, YouTube star and licensed marriage and family therapist, talks about how our mental health has changed during the pandemic. She offers practical, usable advice on how to release the anxious energy that’s been building up inside of us these past 9 months. Plus, why we need to start having open, honest conversations with our kids about what’s going on with the pandemic. “I'd encourage you to not sugarcoat it. You can say it's really scary. I don't understand a lot of things. I'm not a scientist. This is what they're telling us. This is what we're doing. This is why we're wearing masks. This is why I was sad the other day. We need to put context to it.” You can follow Kati Morton on Twitter and Instagram @katimorton.    Support the show by checking out our sponsors! Livinguard activity masks use materials with amazing properties that deactivate viruses and bacteria continuously, safely and in a sustainable way. They are super comfortable as well. Get 10% off your activity mask when you go to shop.livinguard.com and use code GOODKIDS10 at checkout.   Interested in learning more about Kati? Check out the links below:  Subscribe to Kati’s YouTube channel, where she posts new videos every Monday: https://www.youtube.com/user/katimorton.  Listen to Kati’s podcast, Ask Kati Anything: https://www.katimorton.com/podcasts.   Keep up with all of Kati’s work on her website: https://www.katimorton.com/.     To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to https://www.lemonadamedia.com/show/good-kids/ shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with Good Kids and everything from Lemonada on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com.   If you want to submit a show idea, email us at goodkids@lemonadamedia.com.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
12 min
Strange Animals Podcast
Strange Animals Podcast
Katherine Shaw
Episode 200: Elephants
This week we're going to learn about elephants! Thanks to Damian, Pranav, and Richard from NC for the suggestions! Further Reading: Dwarf Elephant Facts and Figures An Asian elephant (left) and an African elephant (right). Note the ear size difference, the easiest way to tell which kind of elephant you're looking at: Business end of an Asian elephant's trunk: An elephant living the good life: Can't quite reach: Elephant teef: A dwarf elephant skeleton: An elephant skull does kind of look like a giant one-eyed human skull: Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I’m your host, Kate Shaw. This week we’re going to learn about some elephants! We’ve talked about elephants many times before, but not recently, and we’ve not really gone into detail about living elephants. Thanks to Damian, Pranav, and Richard from NC for the suggestions. Damian in particular sent this suggestion to me so long ago that he’s probably stopped listening, probably because he’s grown up and graduated from college and started a family and probably his kids are now in college too, it’s been so long. Okay, it hasn’t been that long. It just feels like it. Sorry I took so long to get to your suggestion. Anyway, Damian wanted to hear about African and Asian elephants, so we’ll start there. Those are the elephants still living today, and honestly, we are so lucky to have them in the world! If you’ve ever wished you could see a live mammoth, as I often have, thank your lucky stars that you can still see an elephant. Elephants are in the family Elephantidae, which includes both living elephants and their extinct close relations. Living elephants include the Asian elephant and the African elephant, with two subspecies, the African savanna elephant and the African forest elephant. The savanna elephant is the largest. The tallest elephant ever measured was a male African elephant who stood 13 feet high at the shoulder, or just under 4 meters, which is just ridiculously tall. That’s two Michael Jordans standing on top of each other, and I don’t know how you would clone Michael Jordan or get one of them to balance on the other’s head, but if you did, they would be the same size as this one huge elephant. The largest Asian elephant ever measured was a male who stood 11.3 feet tall, or 3.43 meters. Generally, though, it’s hard to measure how tall or heavy a wild elephant is because first of all they don’t usually want anything to do with humans, and second, where are you going to get a scale big and strong enough to weigh an elephant? Most male African elephants are closer to 11 feet tall, or 3.3 meters, while females are smaller, and the average male Asian elephant is around 9 feet tall, or 2.75 meters, and females are also smaller. Even a small elephant is massive, though. Because of its size, the elephant can’t jump or run, but it can move pretty darn fast even so, up to 16 mph, or 25 km/h. The fastest human ever measured was Usain Bolt, who can run 28 mph, or 45 km/h, but only for very short distances. A more average running speed for a person in good condition is about 6 mph, or 9.6 km/h, and again, that’s just for short sprints. So the elephant can really hustle. Its big feet are cushioned on the bottoms so that it can actually move almost noiselessly. And I know you’re wondering it, so yes, an elephant could probably be a good ninja if it wanted to. It would have to carry its sword in its trunk, though. The elephant is also a really good swimmer, surprisingly, and it can use its trunk as a snorkel when it’s underwater. It likes to spend time in the water, which keeps it cool, and it will wallow in mud when it can. The mud helps protect it from the sun and from insect bites. Its skin is thick but it’s also sensitive, and it doesn’t have a lot of hair to protect it. The elephant is a herbivore that only eats plants, but it eats a lot of them.
23 min
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