Overdue
Overdue
Sep 14, 2020
Ep 435 - The Yiddish Policemen's Union, by Michael Chabon
Play episode · 1 hr 9 min

Michael Chabon's 2007 alternate history novel is a murder mystery featuring a hard-boiled detective, though neither the detective nor the murder mystery are the most memorable parts of it. The alternate history part, along with Chabon's prose, are enough to make up for whatever other shortcomings the novel might have.

Our theme music was composed by Nick Lerangis.

My Year in Mensa
My Year in Mensa
iHeartRadio & Jamie Loftus
Episode 4: Scottish Hooters and the Death of the Mensa Slut
Welcome to My Year in Mensa, episode final! NOTE: ALL NAMES IN THIS PIECE HAVE BEEN CHANGED. This is a first-person account based on my own writing and experience within the group, and the rest is sourced below. If you have further questions, feel free to reach out at myyearinmensa@gmail.com. Theme song by Sadie Dupuis (@sad13) Featuring the voices of Miles Gray, Caitlin Durante, Jacquis Neal, Anna Hossnieh, Danl Goodman, Ify Nwadiwe, Dani Fernandez, Maggie Mae Fish, Shereen Lani-Younes, Isaac Taylor, and Jack O'Brien. Music used in this episode: "Through the Crystal" by Jeremy Blake: from the free YouTube Audio Library   "Absolutely Nothing" by Jeremy Blake: from the free YouTube Audio Library   "Lost and Found" by Jeremy Blake: from the free YouTube Audio Library "Highland, Bagpipe, Joyful Song": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_ZqBSq7_GA Licensed to YouTube by Epidemic Sound (on behalf of Epidemic Sound); Epidemic Sound Publishing "Scheming Weasel (faster version)" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) "Clean Soul" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)   License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) “Your Call" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) "The Time of My Life" Karaoke (Fair Use): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGAW18eoevk "Pixelland" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)   License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) "Official National Anthem" by Jingle Punks: from the free YouTube Audio Library All sources for this series can be found at: http://jamieloftusisinnocent.com/myyearinmensasources --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jamie-loftus/message Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
45 min
History is Gay
History is Gay
Leigh & Gretchen
Episode 0.9: Back in the Saddle Again: Trans Edition
Get ready to slap on your spurs once more, because we're back with more trans vagabonds of the wild west! In our last full episode, Leigh and guest host Ashten promised more tidbits and tales of transgender trailblazers that we weren't able to cover in our time together, so here's a bonus for you! Strap in to hear the (abbreviated) tales of several awesome folks we just couldn't bear to leave out. Thank you to Ashten Hope for the additional research provided to make this bonus episode possible! Outline: 0:00 - Introduction and event announcement 2:37 - Joe Monahan 5:58 - John Runk 7:17 - Ray Leonard 8:58 - Bert Martin 10:35 - Joseph Lobdell 15:21 - Jean Bonnet 19:14 - Closing Want to help us continue to make the show? Support us on Patreon and get awesome goodies, behind-the-scenes access, special minisodes, and more! You can get super cool merch in our store! Shirts, hoodies, totes, and other neat things, as well as pages from our History is Gay digital coloring book! If you’d like to help us transcribe the show for our d/Deaf and hard of hearing fans, please head on over to www.historyisgaypodcast.com/transcribe to join the team of volunteers! Find our full list of sources and bonus content at www.historyisgaypodcast.com. Get at us on twitter @historyisgaypod, tumblr at historyisgaypodcast, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts! Don't forget to rate and review so more folks can see the show!
20 min
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
Writing About the Plague in Shakespeare’s England
Between 1348 and the early years of the 18th century, successive waves of the plague rolled across Europe, killing millions of people and affecting every aspect of life. Despite the plague’s enormous toll on early modern English life, Shakespeare’s plays refer to it only tangentially. Why is that? And what did people write about the plague in early modern England? Over the past 20 years, Rebecca Totaro has been collecting contemporary writing about the plague. She has written five books about its cultural impact. We asked her to join us for a conversation about what Shakespeare’s contemporaries wrote about the plague—and why, just as often, they turned away from it. She is interviewed by Barbara Bogaev. Dr. Rebecca Totaro is an associate dean and a professor of literature in the College of Arts & Sciences at Florida Gulf Coast University. She has written or edited five books: Meteorology and Physiology in Early Modern Culture; Representing the Plague in Early Modern England, which she wrote with Ernest B. Gilman; The Plague Epic in Early Modern England: Heroic Measures, 1603–1721; The Plague in Print; and Suffering in Paradise: The Bubonic Plague in English Literary Studies from More to Milton. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published October 13, 2020. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “’Twas Pretty, Though a Plague,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Evan Marquart at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California.
37 min
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