The Future of Polling
Play • 1 hr 5 min

This week, a conversation with two veteran political opinion researchers about the future of polling. They’ll explore to what extent election outcomes can accurately be anticipated. Many believe the predictions before our last two presidential elections were misleading. How much validity is there to that belief? And can polling evolve to better serve us? We’ll hear from Peter Hart and Neil Newhouse, two veteran pollsters from different ends of the political spectrum.

The Harper’s Podcast
The Harper’s Podcast
Harper’s Magazine
Complexity
Mike Pence is a pedophile who has been replaced by a clone. But Mike Pence also had the power to reject Electoral College votes and overturn the 2020 presidential election results. In April 2020, the U.S. military liberated 35,000 sexually abused children from hidden tunnels beneath Central Park. There’s a video of Huma Abedin and Hillary Clinton ritually killing a child for its adrenochrome. The pandemic isn’t real, and Bill Gates has created a vaccine that will change your DNA and control your mind. This is just a sample of QAnon supporters’ many beliefs, some of which openly contradict each other. As Hari Kunzru observes in the January issue of Harper’s Magazine, QAnon is less concerned with finding the root cause of society’s purported ills than it is with laying out, in ever more intricate terms and with ever more involved symbols, how entrenched those ills are. If the guesswork and speculation surrounding the Kennedy assassination provides a benchmark of popular American suspicion, then Q has “the feel of something new, a blob of unreason against which the Kennedy narrative seems quaint, almost genteel,” Kunzru writes. Various preconditions figure into the rise of Q at this historical moment—the aesthetics of contemporary political theater, the accelerant nature of the internet—but beneath them all is a human yearning for simplicity, for an incomprehensible world to make sense according to our preferred terms. In this episode, Violet Lucca talks with Kunzru, a novelist and Harper’s new Easy Chair columnist, about the antecedents and present-day mechanics of QAnon. They discuss the myths of its origins, its fraught internal logic, and its “impoverished understanding of how power actually works.” Read Kunzru’s column here: https://harpers.org/archive/2021/01/complexity-qanon-conspiracy-theories/ This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins
56 min
The Anthill
The Anthill
The Conversation
Recovery part six – 2008 financial crisis and lessons for today
The 2008 financial crisis resulted in the worst global recession since the second world war. The collapse of US investment bank Lehman Brothers in September 2008 caused a meltdown of the global financial system. Money markets froze and there was a major credit crunch as the ability to borrow money suddenly dried up.  To stop contagion and make sure other major financial institutions didn’t collapse, governments stepped in to shore up the system by bailing out the banks. Anastasia Nesvetailova, professor of international political economy at City, University of London, explains what these bailouts involved and why they were so necessary.  Aidan Regan, associate professor at University College Dublin, tells us how the crisis spread across the eurozone and why some countries rebounded a lot more quickly than others. We also discuss how the austerity policies that many governments adopted following the 2008 financial crisis hampered economic growth.  And we explore how emerging markets such as Brazil and China were affected by the 2008 financial crisis. Carolina Alves, fellow in economics at the University of Cambridge, outlines how they were shielded from some elements of the crisis but also left vulnerable to the large reduction in finance that followed.  You can read more research into the 2008 financial crisis and what lessons we can learn from it for today's coronavirus recovery alongside other articles in our Recovery series, which accompany this podcast. This episode was produced by Gemma Ware and Annabel Bligh, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The Anthill is a podcast from The Conversation UK. We’re an independent news media outlet that exists purely to take reliable, informed voices direct to a wide audience. If you’re able to to support our work, please consider donating via our website. Thanks to everyone who has already done so. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
42 min
Aria Code
Aria Code
WQXR & The Metropolitan Opera
Rossini's La Cenerentola: Opera's Cinderella Story
Gioachino Rossini’s operatic version of the Cinderella story may not have any enchanted mice or pumpkins, but there’s plenty of magic in the music. Cinderella (or La Cenerentola, in Italian) has silently suffered the abuse of her stepfather and stepsisters, but in true fairy tale fashion, her fate changes for the better and all is made right by the triumph of goodness over evil. In the opera’s joyous finale “Nacqui all’affanno… Non più mesta,” Cenerentola looks ahead to a future with no more sadness. In this episode, Rhiannon Giddens and guests explore this universal tale and how it still resonates today. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato sings the aria onstage at the Metropolitan Opera. The Guests Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato loves the strength and sincerity of this great Rossini heroine. She has performed the title role in La Cenerentola at leading opera houses around the world and believes in its absolute celebration of human goodness. Writer Fred Plotkin loves opera – all of it! – and he shares this love in his book Opera 101: A Guide to Learning and Loving Opera. He has a special connection to Rossini’s music, which he feels is all about the heartbeat. Maria Tatar is a research professor at Harvard University in the fields of folkore and mythology. She vividly remembers when her sister used to read fairy tales to her as a child, and believes that we have the right and responsibility to keep retelling these stories in a way that’s meaningful to us today. Mezzo-soprano Alma Salcedo’s mother tells her she’s been singing since she was nine months old. Her personal Cinderella story began in Venezuela and has brought her to Spain, where she has fought to keep her dreams of being a singer alive.
41 min
The Travel Diaries
The Travel Diaries
Holly Rubenstein
Hugh Bonneville
He’s the star of Downton Abbey, Paddington, Viceroy’s House and W1A. Today, I’m joined by one of Britain’s best loved actors - and part-time vaccine volunteer - Hugh Bonneville.  Hugh stars in a new film called To Olivia where he plays the celebrated author Roald Dahl. We talk about that later on in the interview - and he was just so lovely to chat to on a very rainy gloomy lockdown day. I’ve interviewed Hugh a few times in the past and he never fails to make me laugh. He’s travelled so extensively both through his work and through being a really keen traveller himself, so we cover a lot of ground.  He transports us to the deserts of Utah and to pockets of serenity among the chaos of India. We visit the pristine coves of the Costa Brava and the campsites of France. And he reveals what is on the cards for Downton Abbey and Paddington, if you’re a fan of either (or both like me) you’ll be very happy with what Hugh has to say! Destination Recap: * France  * Tamariu, Costa Brava, Spain * Aigua Xelida, Spain * Aigua Blava, Spain  * Sherbourne, Dorset, England  * Road trip through Egypt, Sudan, Uganda and Kenya * Nile River Boat, Sudan * Juba, Sudan * India * Four Seasons Landaa Giraavaru, Maldives * Amangiri, Utah, USA * Mihir Garh, Jodphur, India * Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA * South America To Olivia, a Sky Original film, is out on Sky Cinema and NOW TV right now.  If you’re enjoying the podcast, don’t forget to hit subscribe on your podcast app so that you’re updated with a new episode each week. And if you can't wait til next week, remember there's the first three seasons to catch up on from Michael Palin and Rick Stein to Dev Patel, Richard Branson and Poppy Delevingne.  To find out who’s joining me on next week’s episode, come and follow me on Instagram, I’m @hollyrubenstein - I’d love to hear from you. Share your own travel diaries using the hashtag #thetraveldiaries I’ll be re-sharing your own hidden gems, recommendations and all time faves on my Instagram and here on the podcast.  Thank you to Fujifilm for their support for today’s episode. Book in your free trial with the Fujifilm X-S10 here. Thank you so much for listening, and I’ll be back next week.  Today’s episode was recorded during the UK’s Covid-19 lockdown. It was produced by Holly Rubenstein.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
39 min
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