Cultivating Place
Cultivating Place
Oct 29, 2020
Best Of: Hope Springs - Growing Flowers From Seed, Clare Foster
54 min
In this season of colliding urgencies and not infrequent dismay - the garden offers so many lessons. Among the largest of these, brought to you in the smallest of things, is the hope proffered by seeds. And seed keepers.

To kick off a new series on seed keepers of the world, this week we revisit our conversation with the UK’s Clare Foster, Garden Editor of House & Garden, UK. A gardener, author, and seed-sower herself, Clare’s newest book (with co-author, with Sabina Rüber) is "The Flower Garden: How to Grow Flowers From Seed” (Laurence King, 2019). It’s fun, colorful, and easy - a vote for hope and the future. Listen in!

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The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Play and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.
In Search of Soil
In Search of Soil
Diego Footer
Full Show: Peter McCoy - Mycology |In Search of Soil #7
One of the members of the soil ecology that is mentioned on a generalized note is fungi. Although we recognize their importance, there aren’t a lot of specifics tied to mycology—and that’s because there’s still a lot we don’t know about them. As a branch of science, mycology is still relatively new and a lot less studied compared to other fields of study. Today, we have mycologist Peter McCoy to shed some more light on fungi from a deeply mycological perspective. Peter McCoy is a mycologist and mycology educator with 17 years of experience. Known for mushroom cultivation and mycological remediation, he authored Radical Mycology, a 650-page book of condensed knowledge about fungi. He also created Mycologos in response to the growing need for accessible mycological education. Learn from Peter at https://mycologos.world/ WATCH FULL EPISODES YouTube https://bit.ly/watchISOS Follow Diego @diegofooter - https://www.instagram.com/diegofooter In this episode of In Search of Soil * How are mycelia faring in this day and age? (02:09) * Fungi are the first to come back from the most detriment (03:18) * 7% of CO2 are from humans and 85% comes from the soil (06:00) * Fungal respiration (07:06) * We’re living in the fungi and plants’ world (08:14) * The paradigm shift when studying fungi (09:13) * Tons of undiscovered science behind fungi (11:11) * Mycology: we don’t know what we don’t know yet (11:46) * Fungal mycology and human intersections with mycology (12:18) * We’re in the fourth era of the human-fungal history (13:13) * Mycology is a neglected mega science (15:25) * Where agriculture’s understanding of mycology is (16:02) * Mycology isn’t learned about (17:41) * Shifting the awareness about fungi (18:40) * Fungi in a culinary standpoint (19:58) * Fungi in an agricultural standpoint (20:33) * Fungal mycelium and their compounds may be the primary source of carbon in whole soil communities (22:22) * What exactly is mycelium made of? (27:35) * The fungal cell wall (28:36) * How readily viable is sloughed off fungi? (30:55) * If fungi pair up with plants, how much carbon is produced by the plants, and how much is produced by the fungi? (33:28) * What can a plant do if it’s been stripped off from its relationship with the microorganisms it’s dependent on? (38:18) * Plants have evolved to be entirely dependent on fungi (40:10) * Why some plants don’t form robust relationships with microorganisms (43:35) * The definition of a mycorrhiza (44:44) * Dark septate endophytes or DSEs (45:38) * Does crop rotation make sense in the perspective of plant-fungi relationships? (47:30) * Given a robust soil ecosystem, would fungal intervention suffice in keeping the harmful pathogens away from the plant? (54:43) * Withholding fertilizer application because the soil ecosystem fertilizes itself (58:23) * Trichoderma species of mold (01:00:57) * Assuming there isn’t good fungi in the soil, will the good fungi show up if you take care of your soil well enough? (01:03:36) * Are quickly made compost beneficial to developing fungi? (01:07:12) * What fungi do you need? (01:09:44) * What kind of fungi do you want to encourage to grow in the soil as much as possible? (01:13:33) * Putting in all stages of decomposition in your compost pile (01:19:02) * Is there any heat in fungal decomposition? (01:21:40) * Going about speeding up wood chip compost (01:24:02) * The go-to: garden giant mushroom (01:24:47) * The ideal temperature to speed up composting in a lab setting (01:26:45) * Optimum moisture for fungi (01:28:28) * Oxygen and decomposition: are there fungi that thrive in low oxygen? (01:30:02) * Are we adding fungal food when we add finished compost? (01:32:32) * Soil amendments that benefit fungi (01:34:20) * Growing mycology with community science (01:38:40) * Propagating resident fungi and re-inoculating (01:40:55) * Do compost teas make sense and are they really doing anything (01:45:21) * Propagation: the limiting factor is air agitation (01:47:48) * Stick to paying attention on keeping what’s above ground healthy (01:52:47) * Nature will find a way to put things in place where they belong (01:55:32) * Concentrate on bringing back as much diversity as possible (01:56:35) * A fungal perspective on biochar (01:57:00) * Mycologos, Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy (01:59:38) * Diego wraps up the episode with where to get in touch with Peter McCoy (02:03:28) * Accountability and intellectual honesty (01:05:20) * Anyone can make a mycological breakthrough tomorrow (02:07:33) * Arbuscular mycorrhiza: a mycological mindblower (02:08:31)
2 hr 13 min
The Abundant Edge
The Abundant Edge
Abundant Edge
Working with nature to build soil health, with Robert Pavlis
After last week’s session with Matt Powers, I want to add a second perspective on soil and the new science behind how we can restore it to health in our own gardens. For that perspective I got back in touch with Robert Pavlis who was first on this show a few seasons ago to talk about building natural ponds. Robert has been an avid gardener for over four decades. He is the owner and developer of Aspen Grove Gardens, a 6-acre botanical garden that features over 3,000 varieties of plants. As a specialist in soil science, he has been an instructor for Landscape Ontario and is a garden blogger, writer, and chemist. He teaches gardening fundamentals at the University of Guelph and garden design for the City of Guelph, Ontario, where he lives. One of the things I most appreciate about Robert’s work is that he’s not afraid to challenge any entrenched gardening belief or myth. He is always looking to get to the bottom of what helps plants to grow and what’s just marketing scams.  In this episode we really dive in deep on the fundamentals of soil composition and understanding the nutrients that plants need to thrive. We talk about looking at soil as an ecosystem unto itself rather than a living material, and why striving for ideal soil is not as important as making sure that you have the components necessary for the life inside it.  Robert also helps me to understand what happens in the ground after tillage, mulching, and other amendments. We go over simple tests you can do to diagnose your soil without special equipment or needing to pay for laboratory testing, and by the end, how to use the results of those tests to develop your own personalized soil plan.  This episode alone is like a short but thorough course on soil health, so you might want to keep a notebook handy.  For those of you who want to really expand your knowledge on soil science, I’ve teamed up with New Society Publishers to give away a free copy of this book. If you want to win a copy of Soil Science for Gardeners, just message me through our dedicated facebook group called Abundant Edge weekly regenerative skills and write a post about why you want to amend the soil on your site. I’ll select a winner one week after this episode comes out and send a hard copy of the book to you if you live in the US or Canada or a digital copy if you live anywhere else in the world. It’s that simple, plus you’ll be joining an incredible group of listeners like you who are sharing their regenerative living journey and learning experiences with the community.  Resources: https://abundantedge.com/abundantedge-robert-pavlis/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJfYCNSWCIuOB2sltDh5ZjQ https://www.robertpavlis.com/books/ https://www.gardenmyths.com/ https://www.gardenmyths.com/garden-myths-book-1/ https://newsociety.com/books/s/soil-science-for-gardeners https://www.atitlanorganics.com/online-permaculture-design-certification
1 hr 17 min
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
David Holmgren’s Journey with Permaculture Design Process – Part Two (e54)
Welcome back to Part Two of a conversation with permaculture co-originator David Holmgren. In which David continues sharing significant milestones from his many decades as a practicing permaculture designer. Thanks to this project's wonderful patrons, I was once again able to have the audio professionally transcribed. The text below then received significant edits for clarity from patron Jon Buttery (thanks Jon!), myself, and most importantly David. Thanks also to David for kindly sharing relevant photos that help bring the text to life. Don't miss Part One if you haven't yet heard/read it, and given the quality of thinking David shares in this continuation, I hope you'll leave a comment. I anticipate a follow up conversation with David exploring questions and reflections from your comments, so please make the most of the opportunity. Finally, given this conversation again touches on the core skill of reading landscape, please check out and consider supporting the documentary film David, myself, and videographer Dave Meagher are currently endeavouring to bring into the world. Starting Holmgren Design Services Dan Palmer: All right. Well, here I am for the continuation of the discussion we started earlier. After a bit of a break, must have been, I don’t know, six weeks or something.    David Holmgren: Yeah. It’s been a busy time.  Dan Palmer: I’ll say! - a busy and very interesting time. It turned out the first recording was about an hour, and we got to the point where you'd started Holmgren Design Services, so that seems like a great place to start. You’d told us a lot about the project at your mother’s place in New South Wales and the learning you’d been doing from Hakai Tane about strategic planning, and then shrinking that down to apply to a site level. It’d be awesome to hear about the experience of moving into the space of permaculture design consultancy.    David Holmgren:  In 1983 I started a business and registered a business name. There were lot of things that were going on in my life, which I can also correlate with things that were happening in the wider world: that led me to getting serious earning a living, personal relationships, and also living in the city. The consultancy work I did, was primarily advising and designing for people who were moving onto rural properties; what these days people call a ‘tree-change’.   Consulting on a Central Victorian property in 2020 (as part of the Reading Landscape film project) That work fell into sort of two broad types. One-day verbal onsite advisory, walking around the property and suggesting things with clients. Then there was a more limited number of clients where I was providing reports and plans that gave me the opportunity to reflect. There were a lot of constraints on how to make a viable business in that, especially if your work wasn’t focused on affluent people, but instead empowering people who were going to get out and do these things themselves, often starting from scratch, and often making big mistakes. My advice and design drew on a combination of my own experience as well as observing how others had tackled the back to land process over the previous decade. By then I also had a very strong commitment to Victoria and South Eastern Australia of landscapes and ecologies and design issues that I was familiar with in that territory.   Dan Palmer: Was that where all or the majority of your professional work happened?    David Holmgren: Yeah, it was. There was occasional work further-afield - certainly into the dry Mediterranean country in South Australia and into New South Wales, Sydney region, but most of it was in Victoria.  Dan Palmer: Permaculture was a new thing so in a sense you were defining the industry or making it up as you went along.   David Holmgren: Yeah. It was also a time of very strong backlash against alternative ideas. When I set up the business, I had mixed feelings about whether I would descri...
1 hr 16 min
The Regenerative Journey with Charlie Arnott
The Regenerative Journey with Charlie Arnott
Charlie Arnott
Episode 20 | Matt Moran | The critically acclaimed chef who has his feet still firmly on farm.
Charlie sat with Matt Moran in his restaurant 'Chiswick' in Sydney overlooking his kitchen garden from which herbs and vegetables are harvested to supplement the dishes prepared in the kitchen. It's a great example of Matt's dedication to seasonality, accountability and authenticity in cooking, and highlights his connection to the source of his produce and the farmers which produce it. And being a farmer himself he has kept his feet firmly on the ground despite his successes and critical acclaim. To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group. Episode Takeaways : Chiswick, the restaurant Charlie interviewed Matt in, has a rich history, is one of the oldest restaurants in Sydney and was originally a soup kitchen for navy personnel | The Kitchen garden at Chiswick makes its chefs accountable for what’s in season and on the menu | Covid has bought out the best and the worst in people | Matt grew up near Tamworth in the mid 70s then moved to western suburbs of Sydney and still had connections to farming through his family’s farm at Taralga | Matt’s interest in food started in the home economics class at high school because there were 18 girls and only 2 boys in the class! | Started his career in the kitchen at Parramatta RSL | Searched for work in kitchens during early year 11 | First apprenticeship at La Belle Helene French fine dining in Roseville with Chef Michael de Laurence | He loved his work and was besotted with food | La belle Helene cooking technique and refinement | Matt's appreciation of quality was developed at Matt’s second job, at The Restaurant Manfredi - he learnt about the importance of quality produce | His first restaurant was The Paddington Inn 1991 and first chefs hat at age 23 in the same year | One of his secrets to success was to surrounded himself with people smarter than him | He opened ‘Moran’s’ in 1995 & various others before opening his signature restaurant Aria | Turning point was decision to expand to give others (his staff and associates) the opportunity to develop their skills and opportunities | Bruce Solomon is his business partner. It was important to bring different skills to the table. And brings a customers (Non chef) perspective | High stress industry that has a history of suicide | Legacy of working long hours and lack of support. Culture of perfectionism and ‘don’t share your troubles’ | More openness and support now | Rates of suicide and history is similar to farming world | Planning to build farm stay accommodation at his farm near Thurstan similar to Kimo Estate farm stay near Gundagai | Olive oil is best for flavouring not cooking, grape seed best for cooking! | Definitely rest steaks before serving! | Advice for chefs. Don’t do it for the fame and glory. Do it because you're passionate about it. Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life | Matt is a Thankful4farmers ambassador - it’s a charity raising funds through product partnerships to then grant funds to regenerative farmers and associated businesses to promote the uptake of technology, regenerative practices, and enhance community and farming family well being | Matt is a judge of the delicious produce awards | Australia has the best produce in world. Chefs and customers are spoilt for choice and variety of seed stock, such as the variety of heirloom seeds at Diggers gardening club | Whilst the industry is very competitive, chefs are very respectful, supportive and friendly to each other | If Matt could put a billboard near a highway for all to see, he would have the message ‘Be Kind’ on it… Episode Links : Matt Moran Kitchen Tales - Matt's new YouTube series, Nov 2020 Chiswick Restaurant - Sydney Manfredi Restaurant - Sydney Genevieve Copland - Hospitality Trainer and Assessor Aria Restaurant - Sydney Kimo Estate - Farm Stay and venue, Gundagai, NSW Thankful4Farmers - Matt is an ambassador Delicious Produce Awards Lord Dudley Hotel - Sydney Straight from the Source - an online platform where you can search, explore and connect with the source of your produce.
1 hr 27 min
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