The Daily
The Daily
Jan 25, 2021
Aleksei Navalny and the Future of Russia
Play • 28 min

The Russian activist Aleksei Navalny has spent years agitating against corruption, and against President Vladimir Putin. 

Last summer he was poisoned with a rare nerve agent linked to the Russian state. Last week, after recovering in Germany, he returned to Moscow. He was arrested at the airport, but he managed to put out a call for protest, which was answered in the streets of more than a hundred Russian cities.

Today, we look at the improbable story of Aleksei Navalny.

Guest: Anton Troianovski, who has been a Moscow correspondent for The New York Times since 2019. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Big Tech
Big Tech
Taylor Owen, CIGI
Bishop Steven Croft on Keeping Humanity at the Centre of New Technology
In the early days of the internet, information technology could be viewed as morally neutral. It was simply a means of passing data from one point to another. But, as communications technology has advanced by using algorithms, tracking and identifiers to shape the flow of information, we are being presented with moral and ethical questions about how the internet is being used and even reshaping what it means to be human. In this episode of _Big Tech_, Taylor Owen speaks with the Right Reverend Dr. Steven Croft, the Bishop of Oxford, Church of England. Bishop Steven, as he is known to his own podcast audience, is a board member of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation and has been part of other committees such as the House of Lords’ Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence. Bishop Steven approaches the discussions around tech from a very different viewpoint, not as an academic or technologist but as a theologian in the Anglican church: “I think technology changes the way we relate to one another, and that _relationship_ is at the heart of our humanity.” He compares what is happening now in society with the internet to the advent of the printing press in the fifteenth century, which democratized knowledge and changed the world in profound ways. The full impacts of this current technological shift in our society are yet to be known. But, he cautions, we must not lose sight of our core human principles when developing technology and ensure that we deploy it for “the common good of humankind.” “I don’t think morals and ethics can be manufactured out of nothing or rediscovered. And if we don’t have morality and ethics as the heart of the algorithms, when they’re being crafted, then the unfairness will be even greater than they otherwise have been.”
39 min
The Circular Economy Show
The Circular Economy Show
Ellen MacArthur Foundation
Designing a circular economy for fashion - The Fashion Show (ep 5/5)
In the fifth and final episode of our fashion-focused series, we're looking at how to apply circular design to fashion. Design will shape the fashion industry’s transformation to a circular economy. More than 80% of all environmental impacts from products are determined at the design stage. While traditional design focuses on considering and meeting the needs of the end user, circular design takes a much broader perspective, considering not only the user but the system within which the design will exist. To achieve a transition to a circular fashion industry requires unprecedented collaboration. In this episode, contributors to the Foundation’s upcoming Circular Design Guide for Fashion book join us to explore what circular design means for the fashion industry. - The Ellen MacArthur Foundation is a UK charity working on business, learning, insights & analysis, and communications to accelerate the transition towards the circular economy. Find out more about our work here: www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org More about our work on fashion here. To learn more about what a circular economy looks like for fashion visit our learning path. - Follow us online on these channels: Instagram: www.instagram.com/ellenmacarthurfoundation/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/EllenMacArthurFoundation/ LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/ellen-macarthur-foundation/ YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/made2bemadeagain Fundación Ellen MacArthur (Spanish): https://www.facebook.com/FundacionEll... Fundação Ellen MacArthur (Portuguese): https://www.facebook.com/FundacaoElle...
36 min
Aria Code
Aria Code
WQXR & The Metropolitan Opera
Rossini's La Cenerentola: Opera's Cinderella Story
Gioachino Rossini’s operatic version of the Cinderella story may not have any enchanted mice or pumpkins, but there’s plenty of magic in the music. Cinderella (or La Cenerentola, in Italian) has silently suffered the abuse of her stepfather and stepsisters, but in true fairy tale fashion, her fate changes for the better and all is made right by the triumph of goodness over evil. In the opera’s joyous finale “Nacqui all’affanno… Non più mesta,” Cenerentola looks ahead to a future with no more sadness. In this episode, Rhiannon Giddens and guests explore this universal tale and how it still resonates today. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato sings the aria onstage at the Metropolitan Opera. The Guests Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato loves the strength and sincerity of this great Rossini heroine. She has performed the title role in La Cenerentola at leading opera houses around the world and believes in its absolute celebration of human goodness. Writer Fred Plotkin loves opera – all of it! – and he shares this love in his book Opera 101: A Guide to Learning and Loving Opera. He has a special connection to Rossini’s music, which he feels is all about the heartbeat. Maria Tatar is a research professor at Harvard University in the fields of folkore and mythology. She vividly remembers when her sister used to read fairy tales to her as a child, and believes that we have the right and responsibility to keep retelling these stories in a way that’s meaningful to us today. Mezzo-soprano Alma Salcedo’s mother tells her she’s been singing since she was nine months old. Her personal Cinderella story began in Venezuela and has brought her to Spain, where she has fought to keep her dreams of being a singer alive.
41 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu