TEDx SHORTS
TEDx SHORTS
Dec 4, 2020
How singing inspired revolutions
Play • 6 min

Gina Ochsner shares examples of the power of developing creative protest methods and explains why listening to each other’s stories might be the most effective tool of resistance for all. This talk was filmed at TEDxSalem. All TEDx events are organized independently by volunteers in the spirit of TED's mission of ideas worth spreading. To learn more about TEDxSHORTS, the TEDx program, or give feedback on this episode, please visit http://go.ted.com/tedxshorts.

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Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
103. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy by James Paul Gee
What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy is a book that I read early in my education research quest. At the time, I thought that it had interesting points to make, but I was unclear on quite how to react to it. After several more years of reading and research, it's clear to me that this book is deeply flawed. First of all, the author redefines "literacy" in a very strange way. He takes any form of semiotic system to count as a "type" of literacy. So, for example, if you know how to use a smartphone, then you are "literate" in the layout, symbols, and conventions of smartphone user interface. This is obviously not the kind of literacy that most people are interested on or concerned about, and it is less valuable than "conventional" literacy, partly because of barrier to entry (learning to read is relatively hard, learning to use a phone is relatively easy) and partly because of utility. Secondly, he coins a lot of new terminology for no apparent reason. During the recording I've had to translate some of his terms into more ordinary language, including the usual technical terms rather than his special ones. His terminology only serves to obscure his message and make it seem as if there is more content here than there really is. Finally, and most importantly, his central point is misguided. He essentially says that learning a subject is mostly about socially getting on in that world - knowing how to get on with other artists, mathematicians, surgeons, or whatever other skill "community", depending on the domain. However, this completely overlooks the glaring difference in difficulty between getting to know social conventions and attitudes of a subculture and learning the requisite knowledge and skills in order to be useful and productive in that domain, let alone to actually understand what is being said by other practitioners. The former takes a matter of weeks or months of acculturation, and the latter years or even decades of dedication. If we focus on the social context of knowledge rather than the knowledge itself, to coin a phrase, it would be like making beautiful light fittings for a house that you haven't built - pointless in the absence of the larger task that is left undone. Enjoy the episode. *** RELATED EPISODES Cognitive science (general): 19. Seven Myths about Education by Daisy Christodoulou; 52. How We Learn by Benedict Carey; 79. What Learning Is; 80. The Chimp Paradox by Steve Peters; 81a. The Myth of Learning Styles; 81b. on the Expertise Reversal Effect; 82. Memorable Teaching by Pepps McCrea; 85. Why Don't Students Like School? by Dan Willingham; 86. Learning as information compression Cognitive science (literacy-related): 41. What Reading Does for the Mind by Keith Stanovich and Annie Cunningham; 91. Vocabulary Development by Steven Stahl; 93. Closing the Vocabulary Gap by Alex Quigley; 95. The Reading Mind by Dan Willingham Expertise: 20. Genius Explained by Michael Howe; 22. The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle; 24. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell; 49. The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin; 97. The Polymath by Waqas Ahmed; 98. Range by David Epstein Games and play (including computer games): 34. Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal; 35. Minds on Fire by Mark Carnes; 36. Fun, Play, and Games; 37. A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster Other fads / critical reviews: 42. Do Schools Kill Creativity by Sir Ken Robinson; 53. Brain-based Learning by Eric Jensen; 59, 60 on Brain Training; 62. Brainstorming makes you less creative; 65. Beyond the Hole in the Wall (on Sugata Mitra); 71. Visible Learning by John Hattie; 81. on Learning Styles; 87. Experiential Learning; 88. The Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching
1 hr 30 min
The Working With... Podcast
The Working With... Podcast
Carl Pullein
How Workflows Improve Your Productivity and Time Management.
This week, I take you through the importance of developing your own workflows and explain why these are crucial to staying focused on what’s important to you. You can subscribe to this podcast on: Podbean | Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | TUNEIN Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Linkedin Get the FREE Annual Planning Sheet Get the Evernote Annual Planning Sheet Productivity Masterclass | Create your own custom daily workflow Course Carl’s Time Sector System Blog Post The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl’s YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page Script Episode 167 Hello and welcome to episode 167 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein and I am your host for this show. Over the last few weeks, I have been writing and recording videos on the importance of creating your own workflows. This was something I was working on during my end of year break and this week, I am answering a question on how to develop your own workflows using whatever tools you are using to help you with your work and manage your time. Now before we get to the question and answer, I would like to encourage you to take my FREE C.O.D productivity course. Now, for those of you who don’t know, COD stands for Collect, Organise and Do and it is the foundation of any good productivity system. You see, you need to be collecting every commitment, task and event somewhere you trust you will either act on it or remember it. You also need some time each day to organise all those inputs and to make sure they are relevant and decide what needs to happen next and when. And finally, you need to maximise the time you spend doing the work each day. This course is my foundational course and is completely free. If you have already taken it, I would recommend, as we are at the start of the year, you retake the course as a refresher, and if you have not taken the course, then please do. It will help you to understand the basics and ensure that whatever system you do decide to use personally, you have a solid foundation. Full details, as usual, are in the show notes. Okay, it’s time for me now to hand you over to the mystery podcast voice for this week’s question. This week’s question comes from Joseph. Joseph asks, Hi Carl, I read your essay on workflows in last week’s Learning Note and wondered if you could explain a bit more about how to set this up and more importantly what to do when you have a boss and clients who are contacting you every minute of the day. Hi Joseph. Thank you for your question. Let’s start with the philosophical thinking behind the concept of workflows. To become good at anything you need two things: consistency and discipline. There are other factors such as developing skills and deliberate practice and we do that when we perform our work. But the essentials here are consistency—doing the same thing over and over again—and we need the discipline to make sure we perform those actions whether we are in the mood to do it or not. This is one reason why morning routines when performed everyday work. They allow you to develop the right habits, give you time each day to yourself and brings a little calm in what otherwise can be crazy noisy lives. So, what does creating your own workflows mean? In their basic form having a workflow for your day gives you a structure to your day. Most of our productivity problems do not come from the volume of work we have to complete. Our productivity problems develop because we are not allocating sufficient time to the important things and that often means we are not taking any time to establish what our core work really is. When you do not know what your core work is—the work that you are actually paid to do—then you will find you are dragged off doing nonessential work that does little to move any of your essential, important work forward. So, before you go any further, ask yourself: ‘what are you paid to do?’ You are not paid to respond to email, yet how much time do you spend in your email app each day? Now it could be you are paid to take care of your clients who generally communicate with you via email, but that still does not equal you are paid to check and respond to your email all day. If you are set in front of your inbox for large parts of the day, what that means is you are working reactively and not proactively. You would be better off investing some time anticipating your client’s needs and addressing those needs before they even cross your client’s mind. I remember back in the day when I was working with clients I noticed my clients often picked up the phone or emailed on Friday afternoons and Monday mornings and the questions were always the same: ‘what’s happening with my case?’ At the time I was working with four or five corporate clients and so I produced a simple spreadsheet for each client with a list of all their cases and kept that sheet updated throughout the week. Then immediately after lunch on a Friday, I emailed my clients the updated list detailing where all their cases were and when they were anticipated to complete as well what information we were waiting for. This had the effect of reducing the number of calls I received on a Friday afternoon and Monday morning by over 80%! That’s how you work proactively. Anticipate your customer and client needs and address them before they address you about them. Other things you can do is prepare a standard email your email to all your new customers and clients outlining your procedures and timelines. This very often deals with most of the questions you will be getting. This works whether you are working in clinical trials, real estate, law or sales. Once you know what your core work is and where you need to be spending most of your working time each day you can then develop a workflow that you follow each day. Now, my workflow has gone through a few iterations over the years—usually the name I give each part—but the basics have remained the same for a very long time. I have a start to the day list which includes my morning routines and a quick review of my most important tasks and calendar events for the day. Once those tasks are completed, I move to my Focus for the day list. This is the list of tasks I have decided need to be completed today. There will never be more than ten items on this list and they are all important. Why no more than ten I hear you ask? Well, that’s because realistically I know I will not be able to do more than ten important tasks per day. These tasks do not include non-essential tasks, would like to do tasks or any new tasks that come in through the day. These are simply the most important tasks for that day. It can be very tempting to fill this list up by telling yourself that everything is important. It’s not. There is your core work—remember, the work you are actually paid to do—your project work that if not done will result in delayed projects and any work that has become urgent. By restricting yourself to allowing no more than ten items in this list you give yourself a chance to actually complete it consistently. If you are not completing this list consistently each day, then either you are trying to do too much each day or you are adding too many nonessential tasks in there and you need to go back and look at how you are prioritising your days. The final list is your closing down list. This list is for the nonessential tasks and work or the non-urgent stuff that needs doing some time but has no deadline. It’s also where you have most of your daily routines—the routines that just need doing but do not improve your life or move you closer towards your goals. And also in this list are you closing dow…
12 min
Something You Should Know
Something You Should Know
Mike Carruthers / OmniCast Media / Westwood One Podcast Network
Making Sense of That Voice Inside Your Head & How to Create Great Meetings
I’m sure you’ve seen construction crews sandblasting. Next time you see that - run!. This episode begins with a discussion on the problem with being around sandblasting. And it is a serious problem. Source: Dr. Paul Blanc author of “How Everyday Products Make People Sick” (https://amzn.to/3iug5Me) You know that voice inside your head? It tells you all kinds of things both good and bad. It can be a coach or a critic. Where does that voice come from? How can you use that voice to help steer your life in a positive direction? Joining me to discuss this is award-winning psychologist Ethan Kross. He’s a professor at the University of Michigan and author of the book Chatter: The Voice in Our Head, Why It Matters, and How to Harness It (https://amzn.to/38XXEwa) Meetings are often described as a “necessary evil” at work. A lot of us dread them because they often don’t seem to accomplish much and waste a lot of time. But maybe it doesn’t have to be that way. That’s certainly the view of my guest Mamie Kanfer Stewart. She is founder of a company called Meeteor (www.meeteor.com) which helps companies improve the quality of meetings and she is co author of the book Momentum: Creating Effective, Engaging and Enjoyable Meetings (https://amzn.to/2XXL2yT). Listen as she offers some great strategies to make your meeting more productive and engaging. When was the last time you checked your tires? Your tires can lose about half their pressure before they even start to look flat. Having underinflated tires can cause all kinds of problems and cost a lot of money. Listen as I explain how often you should check and how much air to put in them. Source: https://bit.ly/3oYpjmj PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! https://bestfiends.com Download Best Fiends FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play. Discover matches all the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically! Learn more at https://discover.com/yes https://www.geico.com Bundle your policies and save! It's Geico easy! M1 Is the finance Super App, where you can invest, borrow, save and spend all in one place! Visit https://m1finance.com/something to sign up and get $30 to invest! The Jordan Harbinger Show is one of our favorite podcasts! Listen at https://jordanharbinger.com/subscribe , Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you enjoy podcasts. Let SelectQuote save you time and money. Get your free quote at https://selectquote.com today.     Download Best Fiends FREE today on the Apple App Store or Google Play. https://bestfiends.com Go to https://TommyJohn.com/SYSK to get 15% off your first order! KiwiCo is redefining learning, with hands-on projects that build confidence, creativity, and critical thinking skills.  Get 30% off your first month plus FREE shipping on ANY crate line with promo code SOMETHING at https://kiwico.com.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
51 min
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
TED
A Black Utopia In North Carolina
“I thought I'd come to paradise,” said Jane Ball Groom upon arriving in Soul City, North Carolina. It wasn’t amenities or location that made Soul City paradise, but the promise of what it could be: a city built by Black people, for Black people. Our guests take us back to 1969 when the city was founded and built from (below) the ground up — and while the city itself was short-lived, we’ll see how the seeds it sowed laid roots for spaces that celebrate and center Black culture today. That's a wrap on the season! Share you stand out moments with host Saleem Reshamwala on Twitter (@Kidethic). For photos from the episode and more on the history of Soul City, head to the Souvenir Book of Soul City in the North Carolina digital collections. Special thanks to Shirlette Ammons who we could not do this story without, and our guests Charmaine McKissick-Melton, Jane Ball-Groom, Lianndra Davis, Lou Myers, Tobias Rose, and Derrick Beasley. Extra special thank you to Alan Thompson, who recorded the saxophone music you heard in this episode from Parish Street on Durham’s Black Wall Street. Our unsung hero for this week is Sammy Case who manages the cross-promotions for all of TED's podcasts - if you found Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala from one of your other favorite shows, she’s the reason why! Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala is produced by Jesse Baker and Eric Nuzum of Magnificent Noise for TED. Our host is Saleem Reshamwala. Our production staff includes Hiwote Getaneh, Sabrina Farhi, Kim Nederveen Pieterse, Elyse Blennerhassett, Angela Cheng, and Michelle Quint, with the guidance of Roxanne Hai Lash and Colin Helms. Our fact-checker is Abbey White. This episode was mixed and sound designed by Kristin Mueller. We're doing a survey! If you have a minute, please take it at surveynerds.com/farflung. It really helps make the show better.
57 min
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