ACT in Context
ACT in Context
Jul 7, 2012
11: ACT with Adolescents with Dr. Louise Hayes
Play • 1 hr 44 min

In this episode, Louise Hayes, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist and academic at the University of Melbourne, Australia, discusses the use of ACT principles for therapeutic intervention with adolescents. She describes how to make ACT fun and interesting for this age group, as well as the unique challenges of doing this work effectively. 

About Dr. Hayes

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The Weekend University
The Weekend University
Making the best psychology lecturers available to the general public.
Prosocial: The Psychology of Building High Performance Teams - Dr Paul Atkins, PhD
Dr Paul Atkins, PhD is an organisational psychologist, author and the co-developer of The Prosocial Process along with Steven Hayes and David Sloan Wilson. This unique approach draws from the Nobel prize winning economic theory of Lin Ostrom, evolutionary science, and the psychology of behaviour change to offer a practical framework for creating highly effective, inclusive and cooperative teams - in all walks of life. In this interview, we cover: - The evolutionary science behind why human beings are fundamentally a cooperative species - Lin Ostrom’s 8 Nobel prize winning core design principles and how you can apply them to increase the effectiveness of the groups you are a member of - A practical tool for creating a strong sense of group purpose and identity in any team and why this is vital And a whole lot more. You can learn more about Paul’s work and the Prosocial Process at www.prosocial.world and you can get the book here: https://www.newharbinger.com/prosocial Links: Get our latest psychology lectures emailed to your inbox: http://bit.ly/new-talks5 Check out our next event: http://theweekenduniversity.com/events/ Perceptions Matter: the Common Cause UK Values Survey: https://valuesandframes.org/values-in-action/survey The Personal Noticing Matrix discussed in the interview: http://bit.ly/prosocial-matrix ACBS: https://contextualscience.org/ Prosocial book: https://amzn.to/3hA9Cyb
1 hr 1 min
Smarty Pants
Smarty Pants
The American Scholar
#168: The Many Faces of Aeneas
The Aeneid has a reputation: it’s the founding myth of Rome, used down the centuries to justify conquest, colonization, and the expansion of empire the world over. Although Virgil includes many voices in his epic, Aeneas’s is the one that tends to be remembered—and celebrated, especially by his putative descendant, the Emperor Augustus. But with her new translation of The Aeneid, classicist Shadi Bartsch reveals the many ways that Virgil undermines both the glory of Aeneas and the authority of collective memory, down to the very verb used to begin and end the poem. Bartsch joins us on the podcast to untangle how the story of Aeneas is actually many stories, all in conversation with one another.   Go beyond the episode: * Shadi Bartsch’s translation of The Aeneid * Read her essay in The Washington Post, “Why I won’t surrender the classics to the far right” * Daniel Mendelsohn’s essay “Lost Classics” reminds us that the study of ancient texts is the study of things that are no longer: lives, songs, stories, poems, memories, and the ordinary people who preserved their memory * In case you missed it: listen to our interview with historian Kyle Harper on the discomforting parallels between our current moment and the end of Rome Tune in every week to catch interviews with the liveliest voices from literature, the arts, sciences, history, and public affairs; reports on cutting-edge works in progress; long-form narratives; and compelling excerpts from new books. Hosted by Stephanie Bastek. Subscribe: iTunes • Feedburner • Stitcher • Google Play • Acast Have suggestions for projects you’d like us to catch up on, or writers you want to hear from? Send us a note: podcast [at] theamericanscholar [dot] org. And rate us on iTunes! Our theme music was composed by Nathan Prillaman.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
25 min
SuperAge: Live Better
SuperAge: Live Better
David Stewart
Dr. Vonda Wright: Mobility Will Save Your Life
How do we live to our potential today? What role does movement and exercise have, and how much is enough? How does hormone replacement help for women? What about HRT for men? Dr. Vonda Wright shares her insights on everything from the effects of exercise after 40, 50, and 60 to the benefits of foam rolling for recovery and performance and hormones. She wants to be healthy, active, vital, and joyful for the rest of her lifespan, and she wants to help others in doing the same by bridging the gap between their health span and lifespan. Fortunately, her research and experience as an orthopedic surgeon, speaker, and author has given her the knowledge to do just that. “What gets me up in the morning, David, is the knowledge that by saving your mobility, I’m going to save your life because there’s not one pill besides exercise and smart nutrition that effects all the diseases that we are commonly plagued with. So that’s what gets my out of bed everyday as an orthopod and an author and a speaker.”  “We know that 68% of people do not do any kind of mobility any day of the week. And that’s why about 60% of people in this country can qualify as obese and 30% of our children are obese. And 17% of our children, that we raised, now have diabetes. We need to do something about this now.“ Listen to The SuperAge podcast wherever you get your podcasts.  Sponsored by InsideTracker: https://bit.ly/3pNeEdU Dr. Vonda Wright: https://www.drvondawright.com Dr. Vonda Wright’s books: https://www.drvondawright.com/author-and-expert/ HOT For Your Health Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/hot-for-your-health/id1055206993 Additional Resource: https://estrogenmatters.com
1 hr 2 min
Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast
Gender: A Wider Lens Podcast
Stella O'Malley & Sasha Ayad
12 - Identity vs Role Confusion in Adolescence
The psychologist Erik Erickson’s theory of psychosocial development makes some essential observations about the period of adolescence and identifies the questions at this phase of life as “Who Am I?” and “What can I Be?”. Sasha and Stella examine this developmental period and ask how the concept of gender identity lays atop the teenage struggle for belonging, individuation, sexual development, and autonomy. Links: https://www.amazon.com/Adolescent-Psyche-Winnicottian-Perspectives-Routledge/dp/041516799X (The Adolescent Psyche: Jungian and Winnicottian Perspectives, by Richard Frankel  ) https://www.amazon.com/Untangled-Guiding-Teenage-Transitions-Adulthood/dp/0553393073/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=untangled&qid=1613252941&s=books&sr=1-1 (Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood, by Lisa Damour, Ph.D.) https://www.amazon.com/Hold-Your-Kids-Parents-Matter/dp/0375760288 (Hold on to Your Kids: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood, by Gordon Neufeld & Gabor Maté) https://quillette.com/2018/07/20/trans-activisms-dangerous-myth-of-parental-rejection/ (“Trans Activism’s Dangerous Myth of Parental Rejection,” by Lisa Marchiano) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DI29D8M/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0 (Childhood and Society, by Erik H. Erikson) Extended Notes The process of growing up; although it looks different across cultures, we all have to go through it. Stella shares the coming of age ceremonies she did for her children. There are 8 stages of “growing up” that we do, according to Erik Erikson: Infancy Toddler Early childhood Middle childhood Adolescence 20s–30s — Seeking intimacy 40s–60s — Stagnation 60s+ — Your legacy It’s so important for children to do things with a sense of conviction. Why are the adolescent years so turbulent? Erik Erikson was the person who coined the phrase, “Identity crisis.” Up until 12 years old, everything a parent says is considered “law.” After 12, they turn it off and take in outside influences. This makes sense. Children need this process. Children reject everything you stand for because they don’t want to be a clone of you. As a mother, Stella says there is nothing that strikes terror in our hearts more when our children are unhappy. Once our children are teenagers, is there nothing we can do to help them through this process? Parents need to have a working knowledge of what their teenagers are swimming in. This is a vital time to build a stronger relationship with the child, not disconnect from them. Do you want to understand where your children are coming from? Make the effort to learn what they’re into. Teenagers are agonizing over what to call themselves. It’s difficult. There are a lot of categories to choose from. As our sexuality develops, there is some shame around our feelings. When it comes to becoming transgender, children are not good at making judgments about long-term things. Teenagers sometimes can get wrapped up in the fantasy of blaming someone else for their developmental confusion. No one has perfect parents. There is a common thread on online forums that parents reject trans children, so it sets the child up to be defensive when they get ready to reveal their true identity. So many people are lost in their 20s. That sense of being “lost” is a very vital time in finding yourself. Stella shares the differences between parents and their financial commitments in Ireland vs. the U.S. It appears U.S. children need more of their parents’ financial support throughout their mid-20s. There is a struggle for children to become independent from their parents in the West. This podcast is partially sponsored by ReIME, Rethink Identity Medicine Ethics: https://rethinkime.org/ (Rethinkime.org) Learn more about our show: https://linktr.ee/WiderLensPod (Linktr.ee/WiderLensPod) Support this podcast
1 hr 2 min
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