Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Podcast
Cumulus Podcast Network
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 9/16/21
On Thursday's Mark Levin Show, upon this program's review of federal laws on the role of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, it was determined that the Chairman has no command function over the United States military. None. Although, the Chairman can oversee a combat command function if asked to do so on behalf of the Secretary of Defense. General Mark Milley seized power in contravention of the federal statute. There’s leaking to news outlets to spin the Milley story and minimize its negative fallout. Later, Attorney Michael Sussman from Perkins Coie, the firm that represented Hillary Clinton, has been indicted in John Durham's investigation. He's being charged with making false statements to the FBI when he lied about representing Hillary Clinton in 2016 while lying about Donald Trump. This is the same law firm that laundered the money for the phony dossier paid for by the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign and the Democrat National Committee. Clinton's lawyer, Marc Elias, has raised $715 million through a web of dark money front groups that are prepared to sue their way around existing laws - this must be stopped. Meanwhile, Julie Kelly, Sr. Contributor at American Greatness, joins the show to take on Phillip Bump from the Washington Post who is now attacking this program for the January 6th riot at the US Capitol. Kelly added that two federal judges have raised questions as to the constitutionality of some of these felonies that are being levied against some protesters that didn't even enter the Capitol Building. Afterward, President Biden wants to destroy jobs, the currency, and the American way of life by using Marxism. No company in America has more money and employees than the US federal government and they have the power to make laws. And the Democrat Party wants to be the permanent singular party that dominates all control of the state and its bureaucracy. Finally, Larry Kudlow, former Director of the National Economic Council during the Trump Administration, calls in to discuss how Biden's use of class warfare and welfare programs will further rig the playing field instead of leveling it for all Americans. The Trump Tax cuts did that and the Biden Tax increases will kill those gains.
1 hr 55 min
Radiolab
Radiolab
WNYC Studios
60 Words, 20 Years
It has now been 20 years since September 11th, 2001. So we’re bringing you a Peabody Award-winning story from our archives about one sentence, written in the hours after the attacks, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law - called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) - has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the "war on terror." In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the last two decades. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace. Finally, we check back in with Congresswoman Lee, and talk to Yale law professor and national security expert Oona Hathaway, about how to move on from the original sixty words. Original episode produced by Matt Kielty and Kelsey Padgett with original music by Dylan Keefe. Update reported and produced by Sarah Qari and Soren Wheeler. Special thanks to Brian Finucane. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.
1 hr 9 min
The Ezra Klein Show
The Ezra Klein Show
New York Times Opinion
Economics Needs to Reckon With What It Doesn’t Know
“The world discovered that John Maynard Keynes was right when he declared during World War II that ‘anything we can actually do, we can afford,’” writes Adam Tooze. “Budget constraints don’t seem to exist; money is a mere technicality. The hard limits of financial sustainability, policed, we used to think, by ferocious bond markets, were blurred by the 2008 financial crisis. In 2020, they were erased.” Tooze is an economic historian at Columbia University, co-hosts the podcast “Ones and Tooze,” writes the brilliant Chartbook blog and is the author of “Crashed,” the single best history of the 2008 financial crisis. He’s now out with a new book, “Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World’s Economy,” which tells the story of the unprecedented global economic response to the pandemic. The central thread of Tooze’s work is how the past decade of crises has upended many of the core assumptions that have guided economic policymaking for the past 50 years — including ones that many contemporary economists and policymakers continue to cling to. So that’s what we mainly talk about here. But we also discuss how the boundaries of acceptable thought in the economics profession are policed, the actual risk of runaway inflation, the limits of green monetary policy, the fight over Jerome Powell’s reappointment as Fed chair, what the Covid crisis reveals about our ability to respond to the climate crisis, the need for a supply-side progressivism and more. Mentioned: “Declining worker power and American economic performance” by Anna Stansbury and Larry Summers “The green swan: Central banking and financial stability in the age of climate change” Book recommendations: The Deficit Myth by Stephanie Kelton Stalingrad by Vasily Grossman Essays in Persuasion by John Maynard Keynes You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs. Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com. “The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.
1 hr 16 min
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